Practice patterns and perceptions of Australian and New Zealand anaesthetists towards perioperative oxygen therapy

Daniel R. Frei, Richard Beasley, Douglas Campbell, Kate Leslie, Alan F. Merry, Matthew Moore, Paul S. Myles, Laura Ruawai-Hamilton, Tim G. Short, Paul J. Young

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

We conducted a survey of Australian and New Zealand anaesthetists to determine self-reported practice of perioperative oxygen administration and to quantify perceptions regarding the perceived benefits and risks resulting from liberal oxygen therapy delivered in a manner consistent with the current World Health Organization guidelines. In addition, we sought feedback on the acceptability of several proposed clinical trial designs aiming to assess the overall effect of liberal and restricted perioperative oxygen regimens on patient outcomes. We developed a 23-question electronic survey that was emailed to 972 randomly selected Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists (ANZCA) Fellows. We received responses from 282 of 972 invitees (response rate 29%). The majority of survey participants indicated that they routinely titrate inspired oxygen to a level they feel is safe (164/282, 58%) or minimise oxygen administration (82/282, 29%), while 5% of respondents indicated that they aim to maximise oxygen administration. The mean value for targeted intraoperative fraction inspired oxygen (FiO2) was 0.41 (standard deviation 0.12). Of the survey respondents, 2/282 (0.7%) indicated they believe that routine intra- and postoperative administration of ≥80% oxygen reduces the risk of surgical site infection. Well-designed and conducted randomised trials on this topic may help to better direct clinicians' choices. A high level of willingness to participate (80% of responses) in a study designed to investigate the impact of differing approaches to perioperative oxygen administration suggests that recruitment is likely to be feasible in a future study.

Original languageEnglish
Number of pages7
JournalAnaesthesia and intensive care
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 24 May 2019

Keywords

  • Anaesthesia
  • anaesthetists
  • hyperoxia
  • oxygen
  • questionnaire
  • surgical site infection
  • survey

Cite this

Frei, Daniel R. ; Beasley, Richard ; Campbell, Douglas ; Leslie, Kate ; Merry, Alan F. ; Moore, Matthew ; Myles, Paul S. ; Ruawai-Hamilton, Laura ; Short, Tim G. ; Young, Paul J. / Practice patterns and perceptions of Australian and New Zealand anaesthetists towards perioperative oxygen therapy. In: Anaesthesia and intensive care. 2019.
@article{e4235da767c9494b9145e60e9919a8d0,
title = "Practice patterns and perceptions of Australian and New Zealand anaesthetists towards perioperative oxygen therapy",
abstract = "We conducted a survey of Australian and New Zealand anaesthetists to determine self-reported practice of perioperative oxygen administration and to quantify perceptions regarding the perceived benefits and risks resulting from liberal oxygen therapy delivered in a manner consistent with the current World Health Organization guidelines. In addition, we sought feedback on the acceptability of several proposed clinical trial designs aiming to assess the overall effect of liberal and restricted perioperative oxygen regimens on patient outcomes. We developed a 23-question electronic survey that was emailed to 972 randomly selected Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists (ANZCA) Fellows. We received responses from 282 of 972 invitees (response rate 29{\%}). The majority of survey participants indicated that they routinely titrate inspired oxygen to a level they feel is safe (164/282, 58{\%}) or minimise oxygen administration (82/282, 29{\%}), while 5{\%} of respondents indicated that they aim to maximise oxygen administration. The mean value for targeted intraoperative fraction inspired oxygen (FiO2) was 0.41 (standard deviation 0.12). Of the survey respondents, 2/282 (0.7{\%}) indicated they believe that routine intra- and postoperative administration of ≥80{\%} oxygen reduces the risk of surgical site infection. Well-designed and conducted randomised trials on this topic may help to better direct clinicians' choices. A high level of willingness to participate (80{\%} of responses) in a study designed to investigate the impact of differing approaches to perioperative oxygen administration suggests that recruitment is likely to be feasible in a future study.",
keywords = "Anaesthesia, anaesthetists, hyperoxia, oxygen, questionnaire, surgical site infection, survey",
author = "Frei, {Daniel R.} and Richard Beasley and Douglas Campbell and Kate Leslie and Merry, {Alan F.} and Matthew Moore and Myles, {Paul S.} and Laura Ruawai-Hamilton and Short, {Tim G.} and Young, {Paul J.}",
year = "2019",
month = "5",
day = "24",
doi = "10.1177/0310057X19842245",
language = "English",
journal = "Anaesthesia and intensive care",
issn = "0310-057X",
publisher = "Australian Society of Anaesthetists",

}

Practice patterns and perceptions of Australian and New Zealand anaesthetists towards perioperative oxygen therapy. / Frei, Daniel R.; Beasley, Richard; Campbell, Douglas; Leslie, Kate; Merry, Alan F.; Moore, Matthew; Myles, Paul S.; Ruawai-Hamilton, Laura; Short, Tim G.; Young, Paul J.

In: Anaesthesia and intensive care, 24.05.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Practice patterns and perceptions of Australian and New Zealand anaesthetists towards perioperative oxygen therapy

AU - Frei, Daniel R.

AU - Beasley, Richard

AU - Campbell, Douglas

AU - Leslie, Kate

AU - Merry, Alan F.

AU - Moore, Matthew

AU - Myles, Paul S.

AU - Ruawai-Hamilton, Laura

AU - Short, Tim G.

AU - Young, Paul J.

PY - 2019/5/24

Y1 - 2019/5/24

N2 - We conducted a survey of Australian and New Zealand anaesthetists to determine self-reported practice of perioperative oxygen administration and to quantify perceptions regarding the perceived benefits and risks resulting from liberal oxygen therapy delivered in a manner consistent with the current World Health Organization guidelines. In addition, we sought feedback on the acceptability of several proposed clinical trial designs aiming to assess the overall effect of liberal and restricted perioperative oxygen regimens on patient outcomes. We developed a 23-question electronic survey that was emailed to 972 randomly selected Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists (ANZCA) Fellows. We received responses from 282 of 972 invitees (response rate 29%). The majority of survey participants indicated that they routinely titrate inspired oxygen to a level they feel is safe (164/282, 58%) or minimise oxygen administration (82/282, 29%), while 5% of respondents indicated that they aim to maximise oxygen administration. The mean value for targeted intraoperative fraction inspired oxygen (FiO2) was 0.41 (standard deviation 0.12). Of the survey respondents, 2/282 (0.7%) indicated they believe that routine intra- and postoperative administration of ≥80% oxygen reduces the risk of surgical site infection. Well-designed and conducted randomised trials on this topic may help to better direct clinicians' choices. A high level of willingness to participate (80% of responses) in a study designed to investigate the impact of differing approaches to perioperative oxygen administration suggests that recruitment is likely to be feasible in a future study.

AB - We conducted a survey of Australian and New Zealand anaesthetists to determine self-reported practice of perioperative oxygen administration and to quantify perceptions regarding the perceived benefits and risks resulting from liberal oxygen therapy delivered in a manner consistent with the current World Health Organization guidelines. In addition, we sought feedback on the acceptability of several proposed clinical trial designs aiming to assess the overall effect of liberal and restricted perioperative oxygen regimens on patient outcomes. We developed a 23-question electronic survey that was emailed to 972 randomly selected Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists (ANZCA) Fellows. We received responses from 282 of 972 invitees (response rate 29%). The majority of survey participants indicated that they routinely titrate inspired oxygen to a level they feel is safe (164/282, 58%) or minimise oxygen administration (82/282, 29%), while 5% of respondents indicated that they aim to maximise oxygen administration. The mean value for targeted intraoperative fraction inspired oxygen (FiO2) was 0.41 (standard deviation 0.12). Of the survey respondents, 2/282 (0.7%) indicated they believe that routine intra- and postoperative administration of ≥80% oxygen reduces the risk of surgical site infection. Well-designed and conducted randomised trials on this topic may help to better direct clinicians' choices. A high level of willingness to participate (80% of responses) in a study designed to investigate the impact of differing approaches to perioperative oxygen administration suggests that recruitment is likely to be feasible in a future study.

KW - Anaesthesia

KW - anaesthetists

KW - hyperoxia

KW - oxygen

KW - questionnaire

KW - surgical site infection

KW - survey

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85066858734&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1177/0310057X19842245

DO - 10.1177/0310057X19842245

M3 - Article

JO - Anaesthesia and intensive care

JF - Anaesthesia and intensive care

SN - 0310-057X

ER -