"Power to the people!"

social media discourse on regional energy issues in Australia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Social media provides people from all socio-economic sectors with the opportunity to voice their opinions. Platforms such as Twitter provide the means to share one's opinion with little effort and cost. But do these media empower everyday people to make their voice heard? In this research, we introduce a novel approach for investigating the voice of different Twitter groups on social media platforms, by combining text clustering and an analysis of cliques in the resulting network. We focus on a case study using Twitter interactions with respect to energy issues, in particular the closure of coal-fired power stations such as Hazelwood. Implications from this study will benefit stakeholders from governments to industry to the 'common man', in understanding how discourse on social media reflects public consumer sentiment.

Original languageEnglish
Number of pages22
JournalAustralasian Journal of Information Systems
Volume22
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018

Keywords

  • Data mining
  • Graph theory
  • Pattern recognition
  • Social media
  • Twitter

Cite this

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title = "{"}Power to the people!{"}: social media discourse on regional energy issues in Australia",
abstract = "Social media provides people from all socio-economic sectors with the opportunity to voice their opinions. Platforms such as Twitter provide the means to share one's opinion with little effort and cost. But do these media empower everyday people to make their voice heard? In this research, we introduce a novel approach for investigating the voice of different Twitter groups on social media platforms, by combining text clustering and an analysis of cliques in the resulting network. We focus on a case study using Twitter interactions with respect to energy issues, in particular the closure of coal-fired power stations such as Hazelwood. Implications from this study will benefit stakeholders from governments to industry to the 'common man', in understanding how discourse on social media reflects public consumer sentiment.",
keywords = "Data mining, Graph theory, Pattern recognition, Social media, Twitter",
author = "Kerri Morgan and Marc Cheong and Susan Bedingfield",
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"Power to the people!" : social media discourse on regional energy issues in Australia. / Morgan, Kerri; Cheong, Marc; Bedingfield, Susan.

In: Australasian Journal of Information Systems, Vol. 22, 2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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AU - Cheong, Marc

AU - Bedingfield, Susan

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AB - Social media provides people from all socio-economic sectors with the opportunity to voice their opinions. Platforms such as Twitter provide the means to share one's opinion with little effort and cost. But do these media empower everyday people to make their voice heard? In this research, we introduce a novel approach for investigating the voice of different Twitter groups on social media platforms, by combining text clustering and an analysis of cliques in the resulting network. We focus on a case study using Twitter interactions with respect to energy issues, in particular the closure of coal-fired power stations such as Hazelwood. Implications from this study will benefit stakeholders from governments to industry to the 'common man', in understanding how discourse on social media reflects public consumer sentiment.

KW - Data mining

KW - Graph theory

KW - Pattern recognition

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