¿Por qué no les callan? Hugo Chávez’s reelection and the decline of Western hegemony in the Americas

Sean Burges, Tomasz Kazimierz Chodor, R. Guy Emerson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

On October 7, 2012, Hugo Chávez was comfortably reelected president of Venezuela. Just days before the vote, the impression given by major international print media was that it would be close, an assessment that proved to be at best optimistic. Western media coverage of the election in Venezuela was designed to skew the result toward the opposition, and this effort singularly failed. The “propaganda model” advanced by Herman and Chomsky is now faltering in the Americas, and the region is acting in a manner that is increasingly free of influence from the United States. Venezuela thus stands as a case of the citizenry actively and independently asserting its political agency despite clear attempts to redirect its thinking and decision making.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)215-231
Number of pages17
JournalLatin American Perspectives
Volume44
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2017
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Hugo Chávez
  • Election
  • Media
  • Venezuela
  • Hegemony

Cite this

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¿Por qué no les callan? Hugo Chávez’s reelection and the decline of Western hegemony in the Americas. / Burges, Sean; Chodor, Tomasz Kazimierz; Emerson, R. Guy .

In: Latin American Perspectives, Vol. 44, No. 1, 01.01.2017, p. 215-231.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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