Poor general health and lower levels of vitality are associated with persistent, high-intensity low back pain and disability in community-based women: A prospective cohort study

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Abstract

While low back pain significantly impacts on an individual’s well-being, our understanding of the role of well-being in the natural history of low back pain is limited. This cohort study aimed to investigate the association between psychological and general well-being and the development and progression of low back pain and disability in community-based women over a 2-year period. 506 women recruited from a research database were invited to participate. Overall psychological and general well-being and its subdomains were assessed at baseline using the Psychological General Well-Being Index (PGWB). The intensity of and degree of disability arising from low back pain were examined using the Chronic Pain Grade Questionnaire at baseline and at 2-year follow-up. Participants were categorized as having no, developing, resolving, or persistent high-intensity pain and disability. 444 participants (87.8%) completed the study. Women with persistent high-intensity pain had lower PGWB scores at baseline than those with no high-intensity pain at follow-up, after adjusting for confounders (M(SE) = 69.9(2.55) vs 80.1(2.63), p < 0.005). Furthermore, women with persistent high disability scores had lower well-being scores than those without persistent high disability scores (M(SE) = 69.1(3.49) vs. 81.2(0.802), p = 0.001). Moreover, lower scores in the well-being subdomains of general health and vitality were associated with persistent high pain intensity and disability (all p < 0.007). In summary, lower levels of general health and vitality were associated with persistent high-intensity low back pain and disability, suggesting that improving these aspects of well-being has the potential to reduce high levels of chronic low back pain and disability in community-based women.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)7-12
Number of pages6
JournalMaturitas
Volume113
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2018

Keywords

  • Disability
  • Epidemiology
  • General well-being
  • Low back pain
  • Pain intensity

Cite this

@article{81bb885134484a4dad7425cf26da8c30,
title = "Poor general health and lower levels of vitality are associated with persistent, high-intensity low back pain and disability in community-based women: A prospective cohort study",
abstract = "While low back pain significantly impacts on an individual’s well-being, our understanding of the role of well-being in the natural history of low back pain is limited. This cohort study aimed to investigate the association between psychological and general well-being and the development and progression of low back pain and disability in community-based women over a 2-year period. 506 women recruited from a research database were invited to participate. Overall psychological and general well-being and its subdomains were assessed at baseline using the Psychological General Well-Being Index (PGWB). The intensity of and degree of disability arising from low back pain were examined using the Chronic Pain Grade Questionnaire at baseline and at 2-year follow-up. Participants were categorized as having no, developing, resolving, or persistent high-intensity pain and disability. 444 participants (87.8{\%}) completed the study. Women with persistent high-intensity pain had lower PGWB scores at baseline than those with no high-intensity pain at follow-up, after adjusting for confounders (M(SE) = 69.9(2.55) vs 80.1(2.63), p < 0.005). Furthermore, women with persistent high disability scores had lower well-being scores than those without persistent high disability scores (M(SE) = 69.1(3.49) vs. 81.2(0.802), p = 0.001). Moreover, lower scores in the well-being subdomains of general health and vitality were associated with persistent high pain intensity and disability (all p < 0.007). In summary, lower levels of general health and vitality were associated with persistent high-intensity low back pain and disability, suggesting that improving these aspects of well-being has the potential to reduce high levels of chronic low back pain and disability in community-based women.",
keywords = "Disability, Epidemiology, General well-being, Low back pain, Pain intensity",
author = "Sin-Ki Ng and Cicuttini, {Flavia M.} and Davis, {Susan R.} and Robin Bell and Roslin Botlero and Fitzgibbon, {Bernadette M.} and Urquhart, {Donna M.}",
year = "2018",
month = "7",
doi = "10.1016/j.maturitas.2018.04.007",
language = "English",
volume = "113",
pages = "7--12",
journal = "Maturitas",
issn = "0378-5122",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - Poor general health and lower levels of vitality are associated with persistent, high-intensity low back pain and disability in community-based women

T2 - A prospective cohort study

AU - Ng, Sin-Ki

AU - Cicuttini, Flavia M.

AU - Davis, Susan R.

AU - Bell, Robin

AU - Botlero, Roslin

AU - Fitzgibbon, Bernadette M.

AU - Urquhart, Donna M.

PY - 2018/7

Y1 - 2018/7

N2 - While low back pain significantly impacts on an individual’s well-being, our understanding of the role of well-being in the natural history of low back pain is limited. This cohort study aimed to investigate the association between psychological and general well-being and the development and progression of low back pain and disability in community-based women over a 2-year period. 506 women recruited from a research database were invited to participate. Overall psychological and general well-being and its subdomains were assessed at baseline using the Psychological General Well-Being Index (PGWB). The intensity of and degree of disability arising from low back pain were examined using the Chronic Pain Grade Questionnaire at baseline and at 2-year follow-up. Participants were categorized as having no, developing, resolving, or persistent high-intensity pain and disability. 444 participants (87.8%) completed the study. Women with persistent high-intensity pain had lower PGWB scores at baseline than those with no high-intensity pain at follow-up, after adjusting for confounders (M(SE) = 69.9(2.55) vs 80.1(2.63), p < 0.005). Furthermore, women with persistent high disability scores had lower well-being scores than those without persistent high disability scores (M(SE) = 69.1(3.49) vs. 81.2(0.802), p = 0.001). Moreover, lower scores in the well-being subdomains of general health and vitality were associated with persistent high pain intensity and disability (all p < 0.007). In summary, lower levels of general health and vitality were associated with persistent high-intensity low back pain and disability, suggesting that improving these aspects of well-being has the potential to reduce high levels of chronic low back pain and disability in community-based women.

AB - While low back pain significantly impacts on an individual’s well-being, our understanding of the role of well-being in the natural history of low back pain is limited. This cohort study aimed to investigate the association between psychological and general well-being and the development and progression of low back pain and disability in community-based women over a 2-year period. 506 women recruited from a research database were invited to participate. Overall psychological and general well-being and its subdomains were assessed at baseline using the Psychological General Well-Being Index (PGWB). The intensity of and degree of disability arising from low back pain were examined using the Chronic Pain Grade Questionnaire at baseline and at 2-year follow-up. Participants were categorized as having no, developing, resolving, or persistent high-intensity pain and disability. 444 participants (87.8%) completed the study. Women with persistent high-intensity pain had lower PGWB scores at baseline than those with no high-intensity pain at follow-up, after adjusting for confounders (M(SE) = 69.9(2.55) vs 80.1(2.63), p < 0.005). Furthermore, women with persistent high disability scores had lower well-being scores than those without persistent high disability scores (M(SE) = 69.1(3.49) vs. 81.2(0.802), p = 0.001). Moreover, lower scores in the well-being subdomains of general health and vitality were associated with persistent high pain intensity and disability (all p < 0.007). In summary, lower levels of general health and vitality were associated with persistent high-intensity low back pain and disability, suggesting that improving these aspects of well-being has the potential to reduce high levels of chronic low back pain and disability in community-based women.

KW - Disability

KW - Epidemiology

KW - General well-being

KW - Low back pain

KW - Pain intensity

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U2 - 10.1016/j.maturitas.2018.04.007

DO - 10.1016/j.maturitas.2018.04.007

M3 - Article

VL - 113

SP - 7

EP - 12

JO - Maturitas

JF - Maturitas

SN - 0378-5122

ER -