Pleistocene-dated biogeographic barriers drove divergence within the Australo-Papuan region in a sex-specific manner

an example in a widespread Australian songbird

Annika Mae Lamb, Anders Gonçalves da Silva, Leo Joseph, Paul Sunnucks, Alexandra Pavlova

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Understanding how environmental change has shaped species evolution can inform predictions of how future climate change might continue to do so. Research of widespread biological systems spanning multiple climates that have been subject to environmental change can yield generalizable inferences about the neutral and adaptive processes driving lineage divergence during periods of environmental change. We contribute to the growing body of multi-locus phylogeographic studies investigating the effect of Pleistocene climate change on species evolution by focusing on a widespread Australo-Papuan songbird with several mitochondrial lineages that diverged during the Pleistocene, the grey shrike-thrush (Colluricincla harmonica). We employed multi-locus phylogenetic, population genetic and coalescent analyses to (1) assess whether nuclear genetic diversity suggests a history congruent with that based on phenotypically defined subspecies ranges, mitochondrial clade boundaries and putative biogeographical barriers, (2) estimate genetic diversity within and genetic differentiation and gene flow among regional populations and (3) estimate population divergence times. The five currently recognized subspecies of grey shrike-thrush are genetically differentiated in nuclear and mitochondrial genomes, but connected by low levels of gene flow. Divergences among these populations are concordant with recognized historical biogeographical barriers and date to the Pleistocene. Discordance in the order of population divergence events based on mitochondrial and nuclear genomes suggests a history of sex-biased gene flow and/or mitochondrial introgression at secondary contacts. This study demonstrates that climate change can impact sexes with different dispersal biology in different ways. Incongruence between population and mitochondrial trees calls for a genome-wide investigation into dispersal, mitochondrial introgression and mitonuclear evolution.

Original languageEnglish
JournalHeredity
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2019

Keywords

  • subspecies
  • mitochondrial genome
  • South Australia

Cite this

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title = "Pleistocene-dated biogeographic barriers drove divergence within the Australo-Papuan region in a sex-specific manner: an example in a widespread Australian songbird",
abstract = "Understanding how environmental change has shaped species evolution can inform predictions of how future climate change might continue to do so. Research of widespread biological systems spanning multiple climates that have been subject to environmental change can yield generalizable inferences about the neutral and adaptive processes driving lineage divergence during periods of environmental change. We contribute to the growing body of multi-locus phylogeographic studies investigating the effect of Pleistocene climate change on species evolution by focusing on a widespread Australo-Papuan songbird with several mitochondrial lineages that diverged during the Pleistocene, the grey shrike-thrush (Colluricincla harmonica). We employed multi-locus phylogenetic, population genetic and coalescent analyses to (1) assess whether nuclear genetic diversity suggests a history congruent with that based on phenotypically defined subspecies ranges, mitochondrial clade boundaries and putative biogeographical barriers, (2) estimate genetic diversity within and genetic differentiation and gene flow among regional populations and (3) estimate population divergence times. The five currently recognized subspecies of grey shrike-thrush are genetically differentiated in nuclear and mitochondrial genomes, but connected by low levels of gene flow. Divergences among these populations are concordant with recognized historical biogeographical barriers and date to the Pleistocene. Discordance in the order of population divergence events based on mitochondrial and nuclear genomes suggests a history of sex-biased gene flow and/or mitochondrial introgression at secondary contacts. This study demonstrates that climate change can impact sexes with different dispersal biology in different ways. Incongruence between population and mitochondrial trees calls for a genome-wide investigation into dispersal, mitochondrial introgression and mitonuclear evolution.",
keywords = "subspecies, mitochondrial genome, South Australia",
author = "Lamb, {Annika Mae} and {Gon{\cc}alves da Silva}, Anders and Leo Joseph and Paul Sunnucks and Alexandra Pavlova",
year = "2019",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1038/s41437-019-0206-2",
language = "English",
journal = "Heredity",
issn = "0018-067X",
publisher = "Nature Publishing Group",

}

Pleistocene-dated biogeographic barriers drove divergence within the Australo-Papuan region in a sex-specific manner : an example in a widespread Australian songbird. / Lamb, Annika Mae; Gonçalves da Silva, Anders; Joseph, Leo; Sunnucks, Paul; Pavlova, Alexandra.

In: Heredity, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Pleistocene-dated biogeographic barriers drove divergence within the Australo-Papuan region in a sex-specific manner

T2 - an example in a widespread Australian songbird

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AU - Gonçalves da Silva, Anders

AU - Joseph, Leo

AU - Sunnucks, Paul

AU - Pavlova, Alexandra

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N2 - Understanding how environmental change has shaped species evolution can inform predictions of how future climate change might continue to do so. Research of widespread biological systems spanning multiple climates that have been subject to environmental change can yield generalizable inferences about the neutral and adaptive processes driving lineage divergence during periods of environmental change. We contribute to the growing body of multi-locus phylogeographic studies investigating the effect of Pleistocene climate change on species evolution by focusing on a widespread Australo-Papuan songbird with several mitochondrial lineages that diverged during the Pleistocene, the grey shrike-thrush (Colluricincla harmonica). We employed multi-locus phylogenetic, population genetic and coalescent analyses to (1) assess whether nuclear genetic diversity suggests a history congruent with that based on phenotypically defined subspecies ranges, mitochondrial clade boundaries and putative biogeographical barriers, (2) estimate genetic diversity within and genetic differentiation and gene flow among regional populations and (3) estimate population divergence times. The five currently recognized subspecies of grey shrike-thrush are genetically differentiated in nuclear and mitochondrial genomes, but connected by low levels of gene flow. Divergences among these populations are concordant with recognized historical biogeographical barriers and date to the Pleistocene. Discordance in the order of population divergence events based on mitochondrial and nuclear genomes suggests a history of sex-biased gene flow and/or mitochondrial introgression at secondary contacts. This study demonstrates that climate change can impact sexes with different dispersal biology in different ways. Incongruence between population and mitochondrial trees calls for a genome-wide investigation into dispersal, mitochondrial introgression and mitonuclear evolution.

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KW - subspecies

KW - mitochondrial genome

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M3 - Article

JO - Heredity

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