Plasticity induced by non-invasive transcranial brain stimulation

A position paper

Ying Zu Huang, Ming Kue Lu, Andrea Antal, Joseph Classen, Michael Nitsche, Ulf Ziemann, Michael Ridding, Masashi Hamada, Yoshikazu Ugawa, Shapour Jaberzadeh, Antonio Suppa, Walter Paulus, John Rothwell

Research output: Contribution to journalReview ArticleOtherpeer-review

43 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Several techniques and protocols of non-invasive transcranial brain stimulation (NIBS), including transcranial magnetic and electrical stimuli, have been developed in the past decades. Non-invasive transcranial brain stimulation may modulate cortical excitability outlasting the period of non-invasive transcranial brain stimulation itself from several minutes to more than one hour. Quite a few lines of evidence, including pharmacological, physiological and behavioral studies in humans and animals, suggest that the effects of non-invasive transcranial brain stimulation are produced through effects on synaptic plasticity. However, there is still a need for more direct and conclusive evidence. The fragility and variability of the effects are the major challenges that non-invasive transcranial brain stimulation currently faces. A variety of factors, including biological variation, measurement reproducibility and the neuronal state of the stimulated area, which can be affected by factors such as past and present physical activity, may influence the response to non-invasive transcranial brain stimulation. Work is ongoing to test whether the reliability and consistency of non-invasive transcranial brain stimulation can be improved by controlling or monitoring neuronal state and by optimizing the protocol and timing of stimulation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2318-2329
Number of pages12
JournalClinical Neurophysiology
Volume128
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Nov 2017

Keywords

  • NIBS
  • Plasticity, repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS)
  • Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS)
  • Transcranial electrical stimulation (TED)
  • Variability

Cite this

Huang, Y. Z., Lu, M. K., Antal, A., Classen, J., Nitsche, M., Ziemann, U., ... Rothwell, J. (2017). Plasticity induced by non-invasive transcranial brain stimulation: A position paper. Clinical Neurophysiology, 128(11), 2318-2329. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.clinph.2017.09.007
Huang, Ying Zu ; Lu, Ming Kue ; Antal, Andrea ; Classen, Joseph ; Nitsche, Michael ; Ziemann, Ulf ; Ridding, Michael ; Hamada, Masashi ; Ugawa, Yoshikazu ; Jaberzadeh, Shapour ; Suppa, Antonio ; Paulus, Walter ; Rothwell, John. / Plasticity induced by non-invasive transcranial brain stimulation : A position paper. In: Clinical Neurophysiology. 2017 ; Vol. 128, No. 11. pp. 2318-2329.
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Huang, YZ, Lu, MK, Antal, A, Classen, J, Nitsche, M, Ziemann, U, Ridding, M, Hamada, M, Ugawa, Y, Jaberzadeh, S, Suppa, A, Paulus, W & Rothwell, J 2017, 'Plasticity induced by non-invasive transcranial brain stimulation: A position paper', Clinical Neurophysiology, vol. 128, no. 11, pp. 2318-2329. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.clinph.2017.09.007

Plasticity induced by non-invasive transcranial brain stimulation : A position paper. / Huang, Ying Zu; Lu, Ming Kue; Antal, Andrea; Classen, Joseph; Nitsche, Michael; Ziemann, Ulf; Ridding, Michael; Hamada, Masashi; Ugawa, Yoshikazu; Jaberzadeh, Shapour; Suppa, Antonio; Paulus, Walter; Rothwell, John.

In: Clinical Neurophysiology, Vol. 128, No. 11, 01.11.2017, p. 2318-2329.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview ArticleOtherpeer-review

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AU - Hamada, Masashi

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