Plasmodium vivax vaccine research – we've only just begun

Wai Hong Tham, James G. Beeson, Julian C Rayner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleOtherpeer-review

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Plasmodium vivax parasites cause the majority of malaria cases outside Africa, and are increasingly being acknowledged as a cause of severe disease. The unique attributes of P. vivax biology, particularly the capacity of the dormant liver stage, the hypnozoite, to maintain blood-stage infections even in the absence of active transmission, make blood-stage vaccines particularly attractive for this species. However, P. vivax vaccine development remains resolutely in first gear, with only a single blood-stage candidate having been evaluated in any depth. Experience with Plasmodium falciparum suggests that a much broader search for new candidates and a deeper understanding of high priority targets will be required to make significant advances. This review discusses some of the particular challenges of P. vivax blood-stage vaccine development, highlighting both recent advances and key remaining barriers to overcome in order to move development forward.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)111-118
Number of pages8
JournalInternational Journal for Parasitology
Volume47
Issue number2-3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Feb 2017

Keywords

  • Erythrocyte invasion
  • Malaria
  • Plasmodium vivax
  • Vaccine

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