Plasma polymer and PEG-based coatings for DNA, protein and cell microarrays

Andrew L. Hook, Nicolas Voelcker, Helmut Thissen

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter (Book)Researchpeer-review

Abstract

DNA, protein and cell microarrays are increasingly used in a multitude of bioassays. All of these arrays require substrates that are suitable for the immobilisation and display of arrayed probe molecules whilst at the same time resisting non-specific interactions of biomolecules with the substrate in areas between printed spots. To meet these conflicting requirements, three different approaches have been developed, all of which were based on low-fouling, high-density poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) background coatings. In the first approach, the coating was based on allylamine plasma polymerisation (ALAPP) and the subsequent high-density grafting of PEG, followed by the generation of a surface chemical pattern using laser ablation. In the second approach, a photoreactive polymer was printed on the same ALAPP-PEG background. The third approach was based on ALAPP deposition followed by the formation of a multifunctional layer by spin coating a PEG-based polymer that also displayed epoxy groups. The successful demonstration of DNA, protein and cell microarrays has been achieved on each of these coatings.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationCell-Based Microarrays
Subtitle of host publicationMethods and Protocols
EditorsElla Palmer
Place of PublicationNew York NY USA
PublisherHumana Press
Chapter13
Pages159-170
Number of pages12
ISBN (Electronic)9781617379703
ISBN (Print)9781617379697
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011
Externally publishedYes

Publication series

NameMethods in Molecular Biology
PublisherHumana Press
Volume706
ISSN (Print)1064-3745
ISSN (Electronic)1940-6029

Keywords

  • Patterned substrates
  • plasma polymerisation
  • PEG
  • laser ablation
  • contact printing
  • inkjet printing
  • microarrays

Cite this

Hook, A. L., Voelcker, N., & Thissen, H. (2011). Plasma polymer and PEG-based coatings for DNA, protein and cell microarrays. In E. Palmer (Ed.), Cell-Based Microarrays: Methods and Protocols (pp. 159-170). (Methods in Molecular Biology; Vol. 706). New York NY USA: Humana Press. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-61737-970-3_13
Hook, Andrew L. ; Voelcker, Nicolas ; Thissen, Helmut. / Plasma polymer and PEG-based coatings for DNA, protein and cell microarrays. Cell-Based Microarrays: Methods and Protocols. editor / Ella Palmer. New York NY USA : Humana Press, 2011. pp. 159-170 (Methods in Molecular Biology).
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Hook, AL, Voelcker, N & Thissen, H 2011, Plasma polymer and PEG-based coatings for DNA, protein and cell microarrays. in E Palmer (ed.), Cell-Based Microarrays: Methods and Protocols. Methods in Molecular Biology, vol. 706, Humana Press, New York NY USA, pp. 159-170. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-61737-970-3_13

Plasma polymer and PEG-based coatings for DNA, protein and cell microarrays. / Hook, Andrew L.; Voelcker, Nicolas; Thissen, Helmut.

Cell-Based Microarrays: Methods and Protocols. ed. / Ella Palmer. New York NY USA : Humana Press, 2011. p. 159-170 (Methods in Molecular Biology; Vol. 706).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter (Book)Researchpeer-review

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Hook AL, Voelcker N, Thissen H. Plasma polymer and PEG-based coatings for DNA, protein and cell microarrays. In Palmer E, editor, Cell-Based Microarrays: Methods and Protocols. New York NY USA: Humana Press. 2011. p. 159-170. (Methods in Molecular Biology). https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-61737-970-3_13