Plasma cell membrane glycoprotein PC-1

cDNA cloning of the human molecule, amino acid sequence, and chromosomal location

M. F. Buckley, K. A. Loveland, W. J. McKinstry, O. M. Garson, J. W. Goding

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Abstract

The murine cell membrane glycoprotein PC-1 is a homodimer with restricted tissue distribution, being first characterized in plasma cells. We now describe the isolation of cDNA clones encoding the human homolog of the murine PC-1 protein, its complete amino acid sequence, and its chromosomal location. Overall, the amino acid sequence of the human protein is about 80% identical to the murine protein, although the extent of homology varies in different domains. It had not been possible to assign a definitive amino terminus to the murine protein. Comparison of the murine and human sequence necessitates reassignment of the amino terminus, resulting in a cytoplasmic tail of 24 amino acids rather than 58 amino acids as previously published for the mouse. The sequence of several independently obtained cDNA clones indicates that the 3' end of the mRNA is subject to alternative splicing. Southern blots suggest a single copy gene. In situ chromosomal hybridization localizes the gene for human PC-1 to chromosome 6q22-q23, a common site for deletions in human lymphoid neoplasia.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)17506-17511
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Biological Chemistry
Volume265
Issue number29
Publication statusPublished - 12 Nov 1990
Externally publishedYes

Cite this

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abstract = "The murine cell membrane glycoprotein PC-1 is a homodimer with restricted tissue distribution, being first characterized in plasma cells. We now describe the isolation of cDNA clones encoding the human homolog of the murine PC-1 protein, its complete amino acid sequence, and its chromosomal location. Overall, the amino acid sequence of the human protein is about 80{\%} identical to the murine protein, although the extent of homology varies in different domains. It had not been possible to assign a definitive amino terminus to the murine protein. Comparison of the murine and human sequence necessitates reassignment of the amino terminus, resulting in a cytoplasmic tail of 24 amino acids rather than 58 amino acids as previously published for the mouse. The sequence of several independently obtained cDNA clones indicates that the 3' end of the mRNA is subject to alternative splicing. Southern blots suggest a single copy gene. In situ chromosomal hybridization localizes the gene for human PC-1 to chromosome 6q22-q23, a common site for deletions in human lymphoid neoplasia.",
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Plasma cell membrane glycoprotein PC-1 : cDNA cloning of the human molecule, amino acid sequence, and chromosomal location. / Buckley, M. F.; Loveland, K. A.; McKinstry, W. J.; Garson, O. M.; Goding, J. W.

In: Journal of Biological Chemistry, Vol. 265, No. 29, 12.11.1990, p. 17506-17511.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Plasma cell membrane glycoprotein PC-1

T2 - cDNA cloning of the human molecule, amino acid sequence, and chromosomal location

AU - Buckley, M. F.

AU - Loveland, K. A.

AU - McKinstry, W. J.

AU - Garson, O. M.

AU - Goding, J. W.

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