Phytochemistry and biology of loranthus parasiticus merr, a commonly used herbal medicine

Soheil Zorofchian Moghadamtousi, Muhamad Noor Alfarizal Kamarudin, Chim Kei Chan, Bey Hing Goh, Habsah Abdul Kadir

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

30 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Loranthus parasiticus Merr (L. parasiticus) is a member of Loranthaceae family and is an important medicinal plant with a long history of Chinese traditional use. L. parasiticus, also known as Sang Ji Sheng (in Chinese), benalu teh (in Malay) and baso-kisei (in Japanese), is a semiparasitic plant, which is mostly distributed in the southern and southwestern regions of China. This review aims to provide a comprehensive overview of the ethnomedicinal use, phytochemistry and pharmacological activity of L. parasiticus and to highlight the needs for further investigation and greater global development of the plant's medicinal properties. To date, pharmacological studies have demonstrated significant biological activities, which support the traditional use of the plant as a neuroprotective, tranquilizing, anticancer, immunomodulatory, antiviral, diuretic and hypotensive agent. In addition, studies have identified antioxidative, antimutagenic, antiviral, antihepatotoxic and antinephrotoxic activity. The key bioactive constituents in L. parasiticus include coriaria lactone comprised of sesquiterpene lactones: coriamyrtin, tutin, corianin, and coriatin. In addition, two proanthocyanidins, namely, AC trimer and (+)-catechin, have been recently discovered as novel to L. parasiticus. L. parasiticus usefulness as a medicinal plant with current widespread traditional use warrants further research, clinical trials and product development to fully exploit its medicinal value.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)23-35
Number of pages13
JournalAmerican Journal Of Chinese Medicine
Volume42
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Biological Activity
  • Coriaria Lactone
  • Loranthaceae
  • Loranthus parasiticus
  • Mistletoe
  • Review
  • Scurrula parasitica

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