Persistent breast pain 5 years after treatment of invasive breast cancer is largely unexplained by factors associated with treatment

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Abstract

Purpose The aim of our study was to establish the prevalence of breast pain persisting 5 years after the initial treatment of breast cancer (BC) and the relationship between those persistent symptoms and general well-being. Methods The study involved women from Victoria, Australia, who had survived at least 5 years from diagnosis, remained free from recurrence or new BC and completed the fifth annual follow-up questionnaire. Analysis involved both multivariable logistic and linear regression. Results Of 1,205 women, 45 reported breast pain which persisted for at least 3 months following initial treatment, and of these, 80 reported pain persisting for at least 5 years. The factor contributingmost to the likelihood of persistent breast pain was current lymphedema; however, a full multivariable model explained
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1 - 8
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Cancer Survivorship
Volume8
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

Cite this

@article{67c33069382c4bbc93734de31f28cf0d,
title = "Persistent breast pain 5 years after treatment of invasive breast cancer is largely unexplained by factors associated with treatment",
abstract = "Purpose The aim of our study was to establish the prevalence of breast pain persisting 5 years after the initial treatment of breast cancer (BC) and the relationship between those persistent symptoms and general well-being. Methods The study involved women from Victoria, Australia, who had survived at least 5 years from diagnosis, remained free from recurrence or new BC and completed the fifth annual follow-up questionnaire. Analysis involved both multivariable logistic and linear regression. Results Of 1,205 women, 45 reported breast pain which persisted for at least 3 months following initial treatment, and of these, 80 reported pain persisting for at least 5 years. The factor contributingmost to the likelihood of persistent breast pain was current lymphedema; however, a full multivariable model explained",
author = "Bell, {Robin Jean} and Robinson, {Penelope Jane} and Nazeem, {Fathima Nazha} and Mary Panjari and Pamela Fradkin and Schwarz, {Max Allan} and Davis, {Susan Ruth}",
year = "2014",
doi = "10.1007/s11764-013-0306-6",
language = "English",
volume = "8",
pages = "1 -- 8",
journal = "Journal of Cancer Survivorship",
issn = "1932-2259",
publisher = "Springer",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Persistent breast pain 5 years after treatment of invasive breast cancer is largely unexplained by factors associated with treatment

AU - Bell, Robin Jean

AU - Robinson, Penelope Jane

AU - Nazeem, Fathima Nazha

AU - Panjari, Mary

AU - Fradkin, Pamela

AU - Schwarz, Max Allan

AU - Davis, Susan Ruth

PY - 2014

Y1 - 2014

N2 - Purpose The aim of our study was to establish the prevalence of breast pain persisting 5 years after the initial treatment of breast cancer (BC) and the relationship between those persistent symptoms and general well-being. Methods The study involved women from Victoria, Australia, who had survived at least 5 years from diagnosis, remained free from recurrence or new BC and completed the fifth annual follow-up questionnaire. Analysis involved both multivariable logistic and linear regression. Results Of 1,205 women, 45 reported breast pain which persisted for at least 3 months following initial treatment, and of these, 80 reported pain persisting for at least 5 years. The factor contributingmost to the likelihood of persistent breast pain was current lymphedema; however, a full multivariable model explained

AB - Purpose The aim of our study was to establish the prevalence of breast pain persisting 5 years after the initial treatment of breast cancer (BC) and the relationship between those persistent symptoms and general well-being. Methods The study involved women from Victoria, Australia, who had survived at least 5 years from diagnosis, remained free from recurrence or new BC and completed the fifth annual follow-up questionnaire. Analysis involved both multivariable logistic and linear regression. Results Of 1,205 women, 45 reported breast pain which persisted for at least 3 months following initial treatment, and of these, 80 reported pain persisting for at least 5 years. The factor contributingmost to the likelihood of persistent breast pain was current lymphedema; however, a full multivariable model explained

UR - http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs11764-013-0306-6

U2 - 10.1007/s11764-013-0306-6

DO - 10.1007/s11764-013-0306-6

M3 - Article

VL - 8

SP - 1

EP - 8

JO - Journal of Cancer Survivorship

JF - Journal of Cancer Survivorship

SN - 1932-2259

IS - 1

ER -