Performance Anxiety: Sport and Work in Germany from the Empire to Nazism

Research output: Book/ReportBookResearchpeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Performance Anxiety analyses the efforts of German elites, from 1890 to 1945, to raise the productivity and psychological performance of workers through the promotion of mass sports. Michael Hau reveals how politicians, sports officials, medical professionals, and business leaders, articulated a vision of a human economy that was coopted in 1933 by Nazi officials in order to promote competition in the workplace. Hau’s original and startling study is the first to establish how Nazi leaders’ discourse about sports and performance was used to support their claims that Germany was on its way to becoming a true meritocracy. Performance Anxiety is essential reading for political, social, and sports historians alike.
Original languageEnglish
Place of PublicationToronto Canada
PublisherUniversity of Toronto Press
Number of pages361
Edition1st
ISBN (Print)9781442630628
Publication statusPublished - 17 Mar 2017

Publication series

NameGerman and European Studies
PublisherUniversity of Toronto Press

Keywords

  • German history
  • sport
  • work
  • performance
  • biopolitics
  • meritocracy

Cite this

Hau, M. (2017). Performance Anxiety: Sport and Work in Germany from the Empire to Nazism. (1st ed.) (German and European Studies). University of Toronto Press.