Perceptions of Australasian emergency department staff of the impact of alcohol-related presentations

Diana Egerton-Warburton, Andrew Gosbell, Angela Wadsworth, Katie Moore, Drew B. Richardson, Daniel M. Fatovich

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: To survey emergency department (ED) clinical staff about their perceptions of alcohol-related presentations.

DESIGN, SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: A mixed methods online survey of ED clinicians in Australia and New Zealand, conducted from 30 May to 7 July 2014.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The frequency of aggression from alcohol-affected patients or their carers experienced by ED staff; the perceived impact of alcohol-related presentations on ED function, waiting times, other patients and staff.

RESULTS: In total, 2002 ED clinical staff completed the survey, including 904 ED nurses (45.2%) and 1016 ED doctors (50.7%). Alcohol-related verbal aggression from patients had been experienced in the past 12 months by 97.9% of respondents, and physical aggression by 92.2%. ED nurses were the group most likely to have felt unsafe because of the behaviour of these patients (92% reported such feelings). Alcohol-related presentations were perceived to negatively or very negatively affect waiting times (noted by 85.5% of respondents), other patients in the waiting room (94.4%), and the care of other patients (88.3%). Alcohol-affected patients were perceived to have a negative or very negative impact on staff workload (94.2%), wellbeing (74.1%) and job satisfaction (80.9%).

CONCLUSIONS: Verbal and physical aggression by alcohol-affected patients is commonly experienced by ED clinical staff. This has a negative impact on the care of other patients, as well as on staff wellbeing. Managers of health services must ensure a safe environment for staff and patients. More importantly, a comprehensive public health approach to changing the prevailing culture that tolerates alcohol-induced unacceptable behaviour is required.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)155.e1-155.e6
Number of pages6
JournalMedical Journal of Australia
Volume204
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 7 Mar 2016

Cite this

Egerton-Warburton, Diana ; Gosbell, Andrew ; Wadsworth, Angela ; Moore, Katie ; Richardson, Drew B. ; Fatovich, Daniel M. / Perceptions of Australasian emergency department staff of the impact of alcohol-related presentations. In: Medical Journal of Australia. 2016 ; Vol. 204, No. 4. pp. 155.e1-155.e6.
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abstract = "OBJECTIVES: To survey emergency department (ED) clinical staff about their perceptions of alcohol-related presentations.DESIGN, SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: A mixed methods online survey of ED clinicians in Australia and New Zealand, conducted from 30 May to 7 July 2014.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The frequency of aggression from alcohol-affected patients or their carers experienced by ED staff; the perceived impact of alcohol-related presentations on ED function, waiting times, other patients and staff.RESULTS: In total, 2002 ED clinical staff completed the survey, including 904 ED nurses (45.2{\%}) and 1016 ED doctors (50.7{\%}). Alcohol-related verbal aggression from patients had been experienced in the past 12 months by 97.9{\%} of respondents, and physical aggression by 92.2{\%}. ED nurses were the group most likely to have felt unsafe because of the behaviour of these patients (92{\%} reported such feelings). Alcohol-related presentations were perceived to negatively or very negatively affect waiting times (noted by 85.5{\%} of respondents), other patients in the waiting room (94.4{\%}), and the care of other patients (88.3{\%}). Alcohol-affected patients were perceived to have a negative or very negative impact on staff workload (94.2{\%}), wellbeing (74.1{\%}) and job satisfaction (80.9{\%}).CONCLUSIONS: Verbal and physical aggression by alcohol-affected patients is commonly experienced by ED clinical staff. This has a negative impact on the care of other patients, as well as on staff wellbeing. Managers of health services must ensure a safe environment for staff and patients. More importantly, a comprehensive public health approach to changing the prevailing culture that tolerates alcohol-induced unacceptable behaviour is required.",
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Perceptions of Australasian emergency department staff of the impact of alcohol-related presentations. / Egerton-Warburton, Diana; Gosbell, Andrew; Wadsworth, Angela; Moore, Katie; Richardson, Drew B.; Fatovich, Daniel M.

In: Medical Journal of Australia, Vol. 204, No. 4, 07.03.2016, p. 155.e1-155.e6.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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T1 - Perceptions of Australasian emergency department staff of the impact of alcohol-related presentations

AU - Egerton-Warburton, Diana

AU - Gosbell, Andrew

AU - Wadsworth, Angela

AU - Moore, Katie

AU - Richardson, Drew B.

AU - Fatovich, Daniel M.

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N2 - OBJECTIVES: To survey emergency department (ED) clinical staff about their perceptions of alcohol-related presentations.DESIGN, SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: A mixed methods online survey of ED clinicians in Australia and New Zealand, conducted from 30 May to 7 July 2014.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The frequency of aggression from alcohol-affected patients or their carers experienced by ED staff; the perceived impact of alcohol-related presentations on ED function, waiting times, other patients and staff.RESULTS: In total, 2002 ED clinical staff completed the survey, including 904 ED nurses (45.2%) and 1016 ED doctors (50.7%). Alcohol-related verbal aggression from patients had been experienced in the past 12 months by 97.9% of respondents, and physical aggression by 92.2%. ED nurses were the group most likely to have felt unsafe because of the behaviour of these patients (92% reported such feelings). Alcohol-related presentations were perceived to negatively or very negatively affect waiting times (noted by 85.5% of respondents), other patients in the waiting room (94.4%), and the care of other patients (88.3%). Alcohol-affected patients were perceived to have a negative or very negative impact on staff workload (94.2%), wellbeing (74.1%) and job satisfaction (80.9%).CONCLUSIONS: Verbal and physical aggression by alcohol-affected patients is commonly experienced by ED clinical staff. This has a negative impact on the care of other patients, as well as on staff wellbeing. Managers of health services must ensure a safe environment for staff and patients. More importantly, a comprehensive public health approach to changing the prevailing culture that tolerates alcohol-induced unacceptable behaviour is required.

AB - OBJECTIVES: To survey emergency department (ED) clinical staff about their perceptions of alcohol-related presentations.DESIGN, SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: A mixed methods online survey of ED clinicians in Australia and New Zealand, conducted from 30 May to 7 July 2014.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The frequency of aggression from alcohol-affected patients or their carers experienced by ED staff; the perceived impact of alcohol-related presentations on ED function, waiting times, other patients and staff.RESULTS: In total, 2002 ED clinical staff completed the survey, including 904 ED nurses (45.2%) and 1016 ED doctors (50.7%). Alcohol-related verbal aggression from patients had been experienced in the past 12 months by 97.9% of respondents, and physical aggression by 92.2%. ED nurses were the group most likely to have felt unsafe because of the behaviour of these patients (92% reported such feelings). Alcohol-related presentations were perceived to negatively or very negatively affect waiting times (noted by 85.5% of respondents), other patients in the waiting room (94.4%), and the care of other patients (88.3%). Alcohol-affected patients were perceived to have a negative or very negative impact on staff workload (94.2%), wellbeing (74.1%) and job satisfaction (80.9%).CONCLUSIONS: Verbal and physical aggression by alcohol-affected patients is commonly experienced by ED clinical staff. This has a negative impact on the care of other patients, as well as on staff wellbeing. Managers of health services must ensure a safe environment for staff and patients. More importantly, a comprehensive public health approach to changing the prevailing culture that tolerates alcohol-induced unacceptable behaviour is required.

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