Patient-Reported Outcome Measures to Inform Care of People With Dementia-A Systematic Scoping Review

Darshini R Ayton, Madeleine Gardam, Elizabeth Pritchard, Rasa Ruseckaite, Joanne Ryan, Sandra Robinson, Henry Brodaty, Stephanie Alison Ward, Susannah Ahern

Research output: Contribution to journalReview ArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) captures the patient's perspective regarding quality of life, daily functioning, symptom severity, and overall health, and how these may be impacted by health care or other interventions. PROMs are used in clinical quality registries (CQRs) for a number of diseases to assess the patient's perspective of the impact of clinical care on quality-of-life. This scoping review aimed to identify dementia-specific PROMs, determine how the PROMs are being used, and whether they are used within dementia registries. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Three electronic databases were searched using Medical Subject Heading terms for dementia, quality of life, and patient-reported outcomes. Data were extracted on the PROMs used and the methods and mode of administering the PROM. RESULTS: Seven dementia-specific PROMs were identified, however none were used in a dementia registry. All the PROMs were used at the patient level to identify patient needs and health service impacts. Three PROMs were also used at a system level to examine difference in care models. The majority of the PROMs were administered via a researcher or clinician and were predominantly completed by a proxy. DISCUSSION AND IMPLICATIONS: PROMs provide an opportunity for a patient with dementia to share experiences and perspectives of care. A number of dementia-specific PROMs exist, yet none are used in dementia registries and the majority of studies utilize PROMs via a proxy. The use of PROM for patients with dementia, particularly in the context of dementia registries, requires further exploration and consideration.
Original languageEnglish
Number of pages10
JournalThe Gerontologist
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 5 May 2020

Keywords

  • quality of care
  • quality of life
  • cognition

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