Past environmental analogues

P. De Deckker, A. P. Kershaw, M. A.J. Williams

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter (Book)Otherpeer-review

    Abstract

    During the last 10 000yr Australia's climate has on occasions been slightly warmer and locally slightly wetter than it is today. In tropical northern Queensland temperatures were highest between about 5000 and 3600yr ago, and precipitation was also apparently higher at this time. In western Victoria, on the other land, lake levels were very high from about 6500 to 5500yr ago, but were falling between 5000 and 4000yr ago. Quantitative estimates are now possible using bioclimatic indices derived from modern pollen studies, and salinity estimates obtained from the trace element and stable isotopic composition of fossil ostracod shells from carefully selected sites. Antarctic ice-core data show high atmospheric CO2 concentrations during prolonged intervals of warm climate (interglacials) and low CO2 levels during glacial maxima. However, there is no obvious former counterpart to the present very high levels of atmospheric CO2. -from Authors

    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationGreenhouse
    Subtitle of host publicationplanning for climate change
    EditorsG I Pearman
    PublisherCSIRO Publishing
    Pages473-488
    Number of pages16
    ISBN (Print)9780643105041
    Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 1988

    Cite this

    De Deckker, P., Kershaw, A. P., & Williams, M. A. J. (1988). Past environmental analogues. In G. I. Pearman (Ed.), Greenhouse: planning for climate change (pp. 473-488). CSIRO Publishing.
    De Deckker, P. ; Kershaw, A. P. ; Williams, M. A.J. / Past environmental analogues. Greenhouse: planning for climate change. editor / G I Pearman. CSIRO Publishing, 1988. pp. 473-488
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    De Deckker, P, Kershaw, AP & Williams, MAJ 1988, Past environmental analogues. in GI Pearman (ed.), Greenhouse: planning for climate change. CSIRO Publishing, pp. 473-488.

    Past environmental analogues. / De Deckker, P.; Kershaw, A. P.; Williams, M. A.J.

    Greenhouse: planning for climate change. ed. / G I Pearman. CSIRO Publishing, 1988. p. 473-488.

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter (Book)Otherpeer-review

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    AU - Kershaw, A. P.

    AU - Williams, M. A.J.

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    N2 - During the last 10 000yr Australia's climate has on occasions been slightly warmer and locally slightly wetter than it is today. In tropical northern Queensland temperatures were highest between about 5000 and 3600yr ago, and precipitation was also apparently higher at this time. In western Victoria, on the other land, lake levels were very high from about 6500 to 5500yr ago, but were falling between 5000 and 4000yr ago. Quantitative estimates are now possible using bioclimatic indices derived from modern pollen studies, and salinity estimates obtained from the trace element and stable isotopic composition of fossil ostracod shells from carefully selected sites. Antarctic ice-core data show high atmospheric CO2 concentrations during prolonged intervals of warm climate (interglacials) and low CO2 levels during glacial maxima. However, there is no obvious former counterpart to the present very high levels of atmospheric CO2. -from Authors

    AB - During the last 10 000yr Australia's climate has on occasions been slightly warmer and locally slightly wetter than it is today. In tropical northern Queensland temperatures were highest between about 5000 and 3600yr ago, and precipitation was also apparently higher at this time. In western Victoria, on the other land, lake levels were very high from about 6500 to 5500yr ago, but were falling between 5000 and 4000yr ago. Quantitative estimates are now possible using bioclimatic indices derived from modern pollen studies, and salinity estimates obtained from the trace element and stable isotopic composition of fossil ostracod shells from carefully selected sites. Antarctic ice-core data show high atmospheric CO2 concentrations during prolonged intervals of warm climate (interglacials) and low CO2 levels during glacial maxima. However, there is no obvious former counterpart to the present very high levels of atmospheric CO2. -from Authors

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    De Deckker P, Kershaw AP, Williams MAJ. Past environmental analogues. In Pearman GI, editor, Greenhouse: planning for climate change. CSIRO Publishing. 1988. p. 473-488