Passive house vs. passive design: sociotechnical issues in a practice-based design research project for a low-energy house

David Kroll, Sarah Breen Lovett, Carlos Jimenez-Bescos, Peter Chisnall, Mathew Aitchison

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Building performance simulation tools such as the Passive House Planning Package (PHPP) can be invaluable for improving energy-efficiency in housing design. However, achieving improved energy performance is also a sociotechnical issue, and how this is dealt with during the architectural design process seems less well studied. This collaborative design research project for a low-energy prefab house with an industry partner, a manufacturer of Structural Insulated Panels (SIP), is used as a case study to show that it is possible to achieve high energy performance while addressing specific socio-technical concerns within an Australian volume homebuilding market. A key issue that emerged in this project was the perceived tension between passive design expectations in Australia and those promoted through the Passive House software tool.
Original languageEnglish
Number of pages12
JournalArchitectural Science Review
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019

Cite this

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abstract = "Building performance simulation tools such as the Passive House Planning Package (PHPP) can be invaluable for improving energy-efficiency in housing design. However, achieving improved energy performance is also a sociotechnical issue, and how this is dealt with during the architectural design process seems less well studied. This collaborative design research project for a low-energy prefab house with an industry partner, a manufacturer of Structural Insulated Panels (SIP), is used as a case study to show that it is possible to achieve high energy performance while addressing specific socio-technical concerns within an Australian volume homebuilding market. A key issue that emerged in this project was the perceived tension between passive design expectations in Australia and those promoted through the Passive House software tool.",
author = "David Kroll and {Breen Lovett}, Sarah and Carlos Jimenez-Bescos and Peter Chisnall and Mathew Aitchison",
year = "2019",
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language = "English",
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Passive house vs. passive design: sociotechnical issues in a practice-based design research project for a low-energy house. / Kroll, David; Breen Lovett, Sarah; Jimenez-Bescos, Carlos ; Chisnall, Peter; Aitchison, Mathew.

In: Architectural Science Review, 2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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AU - Aitchison, Mathew

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