Parvovirus B19 in HIV infection

A treatable cause of anemia

Andrew Fuller, Len Moaven, Denis Spelman, W. John Spicer, Howard Wraight, David Curtis, Jenny Leydon, Jennifer Doultree, Stephen Locarnini

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We describe the case of an adult male patient with AIDS who presented with severe anemia and on investigation was found to have red cell aplasia due to parvovirus B19 infection. Bone marrow examination revealed absence of erythroid development and rare giant pronormoblasts. Repeated serological examinations revealed a low level of parvovirus IgM but no IgG. Viremia was demonstrated by electron microscopy and by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The patient's initial hemoglobin was 45 g/l and over a four month period he required twenty units of blood. He was treated with intravenous immunoglobulin (Intragam, CSL) at a dose of 400 mg/kg/day for five days. This led to an increase in his hemoglobin to 135 g/l. Parvovirus remained detectable by PCR but not by electron microscopy. Six months later the patient relapsed (Hb 65 g/l). Again he was transfused and treated with intravenous immunoglobulin for five days. His hemoglobin rose to 153 g/l and remained stable. He subsequently received maintenance treatment with 30 g of intagram once a month. We recommend that parvovirus be considered in any HIV infected patient with recurrent anemia.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)277-280
Number of pages4
JournalPathology
Volume28
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1996
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • AIDS
  • Immunoglobulin
  • Parvovirus B19
  • Red cell aplasia

Cite this

Fuller, Andrew ; Moaven, Len ; Spelman, Denis ; Spicer, W. John ; Wraight, Howard ; Curtis, David ; Leydon, Jenny ; Doultree, Jennifer ; Locarnini, Stephen. / Parvovirus B19 in HIV infection : A treatable cause of anemia. In: Pathology. 1996 ; Vol. 28, No. 3. pp. 277-280.
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Fuller, A, Moaven, L, Spelman, D, Spicer, WJ, Wraight, H, Curtis, D, Leydon, J, Doultree, J & Locarnini, S 1996, 'Parvovirus B19 in HIV infection: A treatable cause of anemia', Pathology, vol. 28, no. 3, pp. 277-280. https://doi.org/10.1080/00313029600169154

Parvovirus B19 in HIV infection : A treatable cause of anemia. / Fuller, Andrew; Moaven, Len; Spelman, Denis; Spicer, W. John; Wraight, Howard; Curtis, David; Leydon, Jenny; Doultree, Jennifer; Locarnini, Stephen.

In: Pathology, Vol. 28, No. 3, 1996, p. 277-280.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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AU - Leydon, Jenny

AU - Doultree, Jennifer

AU - Locarnini, Stephen

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