Pain-related work interference is a key factor in a worker/workplace model of work absence duration due to musculoskeletal conditions in Canadian nurses

Eleanor Murray, Renee-Louise Franche, Selahadin Ibrahim, Peter Matthew Smith, Nancy Carnide, Pierre Cote, Jane Gibson, Jaime R Guzman, Mieke Koehoorn, Cameron Mustard

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To examine the role of pain experiences in relation to work absence, within the context of other worker health factors and workplace factors among Canadian nurses with work-related musculoskeletal (MSK) injury. Methods Structural equation modeling was used on a sample of 941 employed, female, direct care nurses with at least one day of work absence due to a work-related MSK injury, from the cross-sectional 2005 National Survey of the Work and Health of Nurses. Results The final model suggests that pain severity and pain-related work interference mediate the impact of the following worker health and workplace factors on work absence duration: depression, back problems, age, unionization, workplace physical demands and low job control. The model accounted for 14 of the variance in work absence duration and 46.6 of the variance in pain-related work interference. Conclusions Our findings support a key role for pain severity and pain-related work interference in mediating the effects of workplace factors and worker health factors on work absence duration. Future interventions should explore reducing pain-related work interference through addressing workplace issues, such as providing modified work, reducing physical demands, and increasing job control
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)585 - 596
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Occupational Rehabilitation
Volume23
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013

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