Outborns or inborns: Where are the differences? A comparison study of very preterm neonatal intensive care unit infants cared for in Australia and New Zealand and in Canada

Canadian Neonatal Network, Australian and New Zealand Neonatal Network

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Very preterm infants born outside tertiary centers are at higher risks of adverse outcomes than inborn infants. Regionalization of perinatal care has been introduced worldwide to improve outcomes.

OBJECTIVE: To compare the risk-adjusted outcomes of both inborn and outborn infants cared for in tertiary neonatal intensive care units in Australia and New Zealand and in Canada.

METHODS: Deidentified data of infants <32 weeks’ gestational age from the 29 Australian and New Zealand Neonatal Network units (ANZNN; n = 9,893) and 26 Canadian Neonatal Network units (CNN; n = 7,133) between 2005 and 2007 were analyzed for predischarge adverse outcomes.

RESULTS: ANZNN had lower rates of outborns compared to CNN (13 vs. 19%), particularly of late admissions (>2 days of age; 5.8 vs. 22.2% of outborns) who had high morbidity rates. After adjusting for confounding variables including gestation, ANZNN inborn infants had lower odds of chronic lung disease [CLD; 17.0 vs. 23.3%; adjusted odds ratio (AOR) = 0.70, 95% CI: 0.64-0.77], severe neurological injuries on ultrasound (SNI; 4.1 vs. 6.7%; AOR = 0.62, 95% CI: 0.53-0.73), severe retinopathy (5.6 vs. 7%; AOR = 0.71, 95% CI: 0.59-0.84) and necrotizing enterocolitis (3.5 vs. 5.4%; AOR = 0.67, 95% CI: 0.56-0.79), but no difference in mortality odds. After excluding the late outborn admissions, ANZNN outborns had lower odds of SNI (AOR = 0.43, 95% CI: 0.32-0.58) and CLD (AOR = 0.63, 95% CI: 0.49-0.81) than CNN.

CONCLUSIONS: ANZNN inborn and early admitted outborn infants had lower odds of neonatal morbidities than their CNN counterparts. However, compared to ANZNN, the higher CNN rates of outborns and their late admissions are likely related to the differences in regionalization and referral practices, and may explain differences in outcomes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)76-84
Number of pages9
JournalNeonatology
Volume109
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016

Keywords

  • Neonatal intensive care unit
  • Outcomes
  • Regionalization

Cite this

@article{750f847dba864fa680ede4622fe1a2cc,
title = "Outborns or inborns: Where are the differences? A comparison study of very preterm neonatal intensive care unit infants cared for in Australia and New Zealand and in Canada",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: Very preterm infants born outside tertiary centers are at higher risks of adverse outcomes than inborn infants. Regionalization of perinatal care has been introduced worldwide to improve outcomes.OBJECTIVE: To compare the risk-adjusted outcomes of both inborn and outborn infants cared for in tertiary neonatal intensive care units in Australia and New Zealand and in Canada.METHODS: Deidentified data of infants <32 weeks’ gestational age from the 29 Australian and New Zealand Neonatal Network units (ANZNN; n = 9,893) and 26 Canadian Neonatal Network units (CNN; n = 7,133) between 2005 and 2007 were analyzed for predischarge adverse outcomes. RESULTS: ANZNN had lower rates of outborns compared to CNN (13 vs. 19{\%}), particularly of late admissions (>2 days of age; 5.8 vs. 22.2{\%} of outborns) who had high morbidity rates. After adjusting for confounding variables including gestation, ANZNN inborn infants had lower odds of chronic lung disease [CLD; 17.0 vs. 23.3{\%}; adjusted odds ratio (AOR) = 0.70, 95{\%} CI: 0.64-0.77], severe neurological injuries on ultrasound (SNI; 4.1 vs. 6.7{\%}; AOR = 0.62, 95{\%} CI: 0.53-0.73), severe retinopathy (5.6 vs. 7{\%}; AOR = 0.71, 95{\%} CI: 0.59-0.84) and necrotizing enterocolitis (3.5 vs. 5.4{\%}; AOR = 0.67, 95{\%} CI: 0.56-0.79), but no difference in mortality odds. After excluding the late outborn admissions, ANZNN outborns had lower odds of SNI (AOR = 0.43, 95{\%} CI: 0.32-0.58) and CLD (AOR = 0.63, 95{\%} CI: 0.49-0.81) than CNN.CONCLUSIONS: ANZNN inborn and early admitted outborn infants had lower odds of neonatal morbidities than their CNN counterparts. However, compared to ANZNN, the higher CNN rates of outborns and their late admissions are likely related to the differences in regionalization and referral practices, and may explain differences in outcomes.",
keywords = "Neonatal intensive care unit , Outcomes, Regionalization",
author = "Sadia Hossain and Shah, {Prakesh S.} and Ye, {Xiang Y.} and Darlow, {Brian A.} and Lee, {Shoo K.} and Kei Lui and {Canadian Neonatal Network} and {Australian and New Zealand Neonatal Network} and Tan, {Kenneth Hark Hong}",
year = "2016",
doi = "10.1159/000441272",
language = "English",
volume = "109",
pages = "76--84",
journal = "Neonatology",
issn = "1661-7800",
publisher = "Karger",
number = "1",

}

Outborns or inborns : Where are the differences? A comparison study of very preterm neonatal intensive care unit infants cared for in Australia and New Zealand and in Canada. / Canadian Neonatal Network; Australian and New Zealand Neonatal Network .

In: Neonatology, Vol. 109, No. 1, 2016, p. 76-84.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Outborns or inborns

T2 - Where are the differences? A comparison study of very preterm neonatal intensive care unit infants cared for in Australia and New Zealand and in Canada

AU - Hossain, Sadia

AU - Shah, Prakesh S.

AU - Ye, Xiang Y.

AU - Darlow, Brian A.

AU - Lee, Shoo K.

AU - Lui, Kei

AU - Canadian Neonatal Network

AU - Australian and New Zealand Neonatal Network

AU - Tan, Kenneth Hark Hong

PY - 2016

Y1 - 2016

N2 - BACKGROUND: Very preterm infants born outside tertiary centers are at higher risks of adverse outcomes than inborn infants. Regionalization of perinatal care has been introduced worldwide to improve outcomes.OBJECTIVE: To compare the risk-adjusted outcomes of both inborn and outborn infants cared for in tertiary neonatal intensive care units in Australia and New Zealand and in Canada.METHODS: Deidentified data of infants <32 weeks’ gestational age from the 29 Australian and New Zealand Neonatal Network units (ANZNN; n = 9,893) and 26 Canadian Neonatal Network units (CNN; n = 7,133) between 2005 and 2007 were analyzed for predischarge adverse outcomes. RESULTS: ANZNN had lower rates of outborns compared to CNN (13 vs. 19%), particularly of late admissions (>2 days of age; 5.8 vs. 22.2% of outborns) who had high morbidity rates. After adjusting for confounding variables including gestation, ANZNN inborn infants had lower odds of chronic lung disease [CLD; 17.0 vs. 23.3%; adjusted odds ratio (AOR) = 0.70, 95% CI: 0.64-0.77], severe neurological injuries on ultrasound (SNI; 4.1 vs. 6.7%; AOR = 0.62, 95% CI: 0.53-0.73), severe retinopathy (5.6 vs. 7%; AOR = 0.71, 95% CI: 0.59-0.84) and necrotizing enterocolitis (3.5 vs. 5.4%; AOR = 0.67, 95% CI: 0.56-0.79), but no difference in mortality odds. After excluding the late outborn admissions, ANZNN outborns had lower odds of SNI (AOR = 0.43, 95% CI: 0.32-0.58) and CLD (AOR = 0.63, 95% CI: 0.49-0.81) than CNN.CONCLUSIONS: ANZNN inborn and early admitted outborn infants had lower odds of neonatal morbidities than their CNN counterparts. However, compared to ANZNN, the higher CNN rates of outborns and their late admissions are likely related to the differences in regionalization and referral practices, and may explain differences in outcomes.

AB - BACKGROUND: Very preterm infants born outside tertiary centers are at higher risks of adverse outcomes than inborn infants. Regionalization of perinatal care has been introduced worldwide to improve outcomes.OBJECTIVE: To compare the risk-adjusted outcomes of both inborn and outborn infants cared for in tertiary neonatal intensive care units in Australia and New Zealand and in Canada.METHODS: Deidentified data of infants <32 weeks’ gestational age from the 29 Australian and New Zealand Neonatal Network units (ANZNN; n = 9,893) and 26 Canadian Neonatal Network units (CNN; n = 7,133) between 2005 and 2007 were analyzed for predischarge adverse outcomes. RESULTS: ANZNN had lower rates of outborns compared to CNN (13 vs. 19%), particularly of late admissions (>2 days of age; 5.8 vs. 22.2% of outborns) who had high morbidity rates. After adjusting for confounding variables including gestation, ANZNN inborn infants had lower odds of chronic lung disease [CLD; 17.0 vs. 23.3%; adjusted odds ratio (AOR) = 0.70, 95% CI: 0.64-0.77], severe neurological injuries on ultrasound (SNI; 4.1 vs. 6.7%; AOR = 0.62, 95% CI: 0.53-0.73), severe retinopathy (5.6 vs. 7%; AOR = 0.71, 95% CI: 0.59-0.84) and necrotizing enterocolitis (3.5 vs. 5.4%; AOR = 0.67, 95% CI: 0.56-0.79), but no difference in mortality odds. After excluding the late outborn admissions, ANZNN outborns had lower odds of SNI (AOR = 0.43, 95% CI: 0.32-0.58) and CLD (AOR = 0.63, 95% CI: 0.49-0.81) than CNN.CONCLUSIONS: ANZNN inborn and early admitted outborn infants had lower odds of neonatal morbidities than their CNN counterparts. However, compared to ANZNN, the higher CNN rates of outborns and their late admissions are likely related to the differences in regionalization and referral practices, and may explain differences in outcomes.

KW - Neonatal intensive care unit

KW - Outcomes

KW - Regionalization

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84986250444&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1159/000441272

DO - 10.1159/000441272

M3 - Article

VL - 109

SP - 76

EP - 84

JO - Neonatology

JF - Neonatology

SN - 1661-7800

IS - 1

ER -