ORGANIZATIONAL VARIATION IN THE MANAGED CARE INDUSTRY IN THE 1990S: IMPLICATIONS FOR INSTITUTIONAL CHANGE

Denise Anthony, Jane Banaszak-Holl

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter (Book)Researchpeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Despite continuing debate about costs and benefits, managed care became an integral part of the health care sector during the 1990s. In this paper, we examine the organizational and practice variation in the managed care industry at two points in the 1990s using a national census of organizations operating in those years. We use a definition of managed care that captures the increased diversity within the industry while still distinguishing it from traditional indemnity, fee-for-service care. We draw on institutional theory to begin to formulate a framework for understanding why certain organizational forms and practices emerged when and where they did.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationReorganizing Health Care Delivery Systems
Subtitle of host publicationProblems of Managed
Pages21-38
Number of pages18
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2003

Publication series

NameResearch in the Sociology of Health Care
Volume21
ISSN (Print)0275-4959

Cite this