Optimising the use of observational electronic health record data

Current issues, evolving opportunities, strategies and scope for collaboration

Siaw-Teng Liaw, Gawaine Powell-Davies, Christopher Pearce, Helena Britt, Lisa McGlynn, Mark Fort Harris

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background With increasing computerisation in general practice, national primary care networks are mooted as sources of data for health services and population health research and planning. Existing data collection programs - MedicinesInsight, Improvement Foundation, Bettering the Evaluation and Care of Health (BEACH) - vary in purpose, governance, methodologies and tools. General practitioners (GPs) have significant roles as collectors, managers and users of electronic health record (EHR) data. They need to understand the challenges to their clinical and managerial roles and responsibilities. Objective The aim of this article is to examine the primary and secondary use of EHR data, identify challenges, discuss solutions and explore directions. Discussion Representatives from existing programs, Medicare Locals, Local Health Districts and research networks held workshops on the scope, challenges and approaches to the quality and use of EHR data. Challenges included data quality, interoperability, fragmented governance, proprietary software, transparency, sustainability, competing ethical and privacy perspectives, and cognitive load on patients and clinicians. Proposed solutions included effective change management; transparent governance and management of intellectual property, data quality, security, ethical access, and privacy; common data models, metadata and tools; and patient/community engagement. Collaboration and common approaches to tools, platforms and governance are needed. Processes and structures must be transparent and acceptable to GPs.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)153-156
Number of pages4
JournalAustralian Family Physician
Volume45
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2016
Externally publishedYes

Cite this

Liaw, Siaw-Teng ; Powell-Davies, Gawaine ; Pearce, Christopher ; Britt, Helena ; McGlynn, Lisa ; Harris, Mark Fort. / Optimising the use of observational electronic health record data : Current issues, evolving opportunities, strategies and scope for collaboration. In: Australian Family Physician. 2016 ; Vol. 45, No. 3. pp. 153-156.
@article{1b139835321643bb9c621f958950d806,
title = "Optimising the use of observational electronic health record data: Current issues, evolving opportunities, strategies and scope for collaboration",
abstract = "Background With increasing computerisation in general practice, national primary care networks are mooted as sources of data for health services and population health research and planning. Existing data collection programs - MedicinesInsight, Improvement Foundation, Bettering the Evaluation and Care of Health (BEACH) - vary in purpose, governance, methodologies and tools. General practitioners (GPs) have significant roles as collectors, managers and users of electronic health record (EHR) data. They need to understand the challenges to their clinical and managerial roles and responsibilities. Objective The aim of this article is to examine the primary and secondary use of EHR data, identify challenges, discuss solutions and explore directions. Discussion Representatives from existing programs, Medicare Locals, Local Health Districts and research networks held workshops on the scope, challenges and approaches to the quality and use of EHR data. Challenges included data quality, interoperability, fragmented governance, proprietary software, transparency, sustainability, competing ethical and privacy perspectives, and cognitive load on patients and clinicians. Proposed solutions included effective change management; transparent governance and management of intellectual property, data quality, security, ethical access, and privacy; common data models, metadata and tools; and patient/community engagement. Collaboration and common approaches to tools, platforms and governance are needed. Processes and structures must be transparent and acceptable to GPs.",
author = "Siaw-Teng Liaw and Gawaine Powell-Davies and Christopher Pearce and Helena Britt and Lisa McGlynn and Harris, {Mark Fort}",
year = "2016",
month = "3",
language = "English",
volume = "45",
pages = "153--156",
journal = "Australian Family Physician",
issn = "0300-8495",
number = "3",

}

Optimising the use of observational electronic health record data : Current issues, evolving opportunities, strategies and scope for collaboration. / Liaw, Siaw-Teng; Powell-Davies, Gawaine; Pearce, Christopher; Britt, Helena; McGlynn, Lisa; Harris, Mark Fort.

In: Australian Family Physician, Vol. 45, No. 3, 03.2016, p. 153-156.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Optimising the use of observational electronic health record data

T2 - Current issues, evolving opportunities, strategies and scope for collaboration

AU - Liaw, Siaw-Teng

AU - Powell-Davies, Gawaine

AU - Pearce, Christopher

AU - Britt, Helena

AU - McGlynn, Lisa

AU - Harris, Mark Fort

PY - 2016/3

Y1 - 2016/3

N2 - Background With increasing computerisation in general practice, national primary care networks are mooted as sources of data for health services and population health research and planning. Existing data collection programs - MedicinesInsight, Improvement Foundation, Bettering the Evaluation and Care of Health (BEACH) - vary in purpose, governance, methodologies and tools. General practitioners (GPs) have significant roles as collectors, managers and users of electronic health record (EHR) data. They need to understand the challenges to their clinical and managerial roles and responsibilities. Objective The aim of this article is to examine the primary and secondary use of EHR data, identify challenges, discuss solutions and explore directions. Discussion Representatives from existing programs, Medicare Locals, Local Health Districts and research networks held workshops on the scope, challenges and approaches to the quality and use of EHR data. Challenges included data quality, interoperability, fragmented governance, proprietary software, transparency, sustainability, competing ethical and privacy perspectives, and cognitive load on patients and clinicians. Proposed solutions included effective change management; transparent governance and management of intellectual property, data quality, security, ethical access, and privacy; common data models, metadata and tools; and patient/community engagement. Collaboration and common approaches to tools, platforms and governance are needed. Processes and structures must be transparent and acceptable to GPs.

AB - Background With increasing computerisation in general practice, national primary care networks are mooted as sources of data for health services and population health research and planning. Existing data collection programs - MedicinesInsight, Improvement Foundation, Bettering the Evaluation and Care of Health (BEACH) - vary in purpose, governance, methodologies and tools. General practitioners (GPs) have significant roles as collectors, managers and users of electronic health record (EHR) data. They need to understand the challenges to their clinical and managerial roles and responsibilities. Objective The aim of this article is to examine the primary and secondary use of EHR data, identify challenges, discuss solutions and explore directions. Discussion Representatives from existing programs, Medicare Locals, Local Health Districts and research networks held workshops on the scope, challenges and approaches to the quality and use of EHR data. Challenges included data quality, interoperability, fragmented governance, proprietary software, transparency, sustainability, competing ethical and privacy perspectives, and cognitive load on patients and clinicians. Proposed solutions included effective change management; transparent governance and management of intellectual property, data quality, security, ethical access, and privacy; common data models, metadata and tools; and patient/community engagement. Collaboration and common approaches to tools, platforms and governance are needed. Processes and structures must be transparent and acceptable to GPs.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84962253652&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - https://www.racgp.org.au/afp/2016/march/optimising-the-use-of-observational-electronic-health-record-data/

M3 - Article

VL - 45

SP - 153

EP - 156

JO - Australian Family Physician

JF - Australian Family Physician

SN - 0300-8495

IS - 3

ER -