On the usage of concrete syntax in model transformation rules

Thomas Baar, Jon Whittle

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference PaperResearchpeer-review

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Graph transformations are one of the best known approaches for defining transformations in model-based software development. They are defined over the abstract syntax of source and target languages, described by metamodels. Since graph transformations are defined on the abstract syntax level, they can be hard to read and require an in-depth knowledge of the source and target metamodels. In this paper we investigate how graph transformations can be made much more compact and easier to read by using the concrete syntax of the source and target languages. We illustrate our approach by defining model refactorings.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationPerspectives of Systems Informatics - 6th International Andrei Ershov Memorial Conference, PSI 2006, Revised Papers
Pages84-97
Number of pages14
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2007
Externally publishedYes
EventInternational Andrei Ershov Memorial Conference on Perspectives of Systems Informatics 2006 - Novosibirsk, Russian Federation
Duration: 27 Jun 200630 Jun 2006
Conference number: 6th

Publication series

NameLecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)
Volume4378 LNCS
ISSN (Print)0302-9743
ISSN (Electronic)1611-3349

Conference

ConferenceInternational Andrei Ershov Memorial Conference on Perspectives of Systems Informatics 2006
Abbreviated titlePSI 2006
CountryRussian Federation
CityNovosibirsk
Period27/06/0630/06/06

Keywords

  • Metamodeling
  • Model transformation
  • Refactoring
  • UML

Cite this

Baar, T., & Whittle, J. (2007). On the usage of concrete syntax in model transformation rules. In Perspectives of Systems Informatics - 6th International Andrei Ershov Memorial Conference, PSI 2006, Revised Papers (pp. 84-97). (Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics); Vol. 4378 LNCS).