Objective classification of tropical mesoscale convective systems

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

A cluster analysis is applied to the mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) that developed in northern Australia and the surrounding oceans during six wet seasons (September-April) from 1995/96 to 2000/01. During this period, 13 585 MCSs were identified and tracked using an infrared channel (IR1) on the Japanese Meteorological Agency Geostationary Meteorological Satellite 5 (GMS5). Based on the lifetimes of the MCSs, the area covered by cloud, the expansion rate of the cloud, the minimum cloud-top temperature, and their zonal direction of propagation, the MCSs are grouped objectively into four classes. One of the strengths of the analysis is that it objectively condenses a large dataset into a small number of classes, each with its own physical characteristics. MCSs in class 1 (short) are relatively short lived, with 95 having lifetimes less than 5 h, and they are found most frequently over the oceans during the early and late parts of the wet season. MCSs in classes 2 and 3 [long and intermediate west (Int-West)] are longer lived and propagate to the west, developing over continental northwest Australia in deep easterly flow during breaks in the monsoon. These two classes are distinguished principally by their lifetime, with 95 of MCSs in the long class having lifetimes exceeding 4 h. Class 4 (Int-East) comprises MCSs that form over the subtropical latitudes of eastern Australia and in the deep westerly flow over northern parts of the continent during the monsoon and active phases of the MJO.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)5797 - 5808
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Climate
Volume22
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009

Cite this

@article{5a66a83ca64f4e6ca8e7f2bfc7ba791e,
title = "Objective classification of tropical mesoscale convective systems",
abstract = "A cluster analysis is applied to the mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) that developed in northern Australia and the surrounding oceans during six wet seasons (September-April) from 1995/96 to 2000/01. During this period, 13 585 MCSs were identified and tracked using an infrared channel (IR1) on the Japanese Meteorological Agency Geostationary Meteorological Satellite 5 (GMS5). Based on the lifetimes of the MCSs, the area covered by cloud, the expansion rate of the cloud, the minimum cloud-top temperature, and their zonal direction of propagation, the MCSs are grouped objectively into four classes. One of the strengths of the analysis is that it objectively condenses a large dataset into a small number of classes, each with its own physical characteristics. MCSs in class 1 (short) are relatively short lived, with 95 having lifetimes less than 5 h, and they are found most frequently over the oceans during the early and late parts of the wet season. MCSs in classes 2 and 3 [long and intermediate west (Int-West)] are longer lived and propagate to the west, developing over continental northwest Australia in deep easterly flow during breaks in the monsoon. These two classes are distinguished principally by their lifetime, with 95 of MCSs in the long class having lifetimes exceeding 4 h. Class 4 (Int-East) comprises MCSs that form over the subtropical latitudes of eastern Australia and in the deep westerly flow over northern parts of the continent during the monsoon and active phases of the MJO.",
author = "Mick Pope and Christian Jakob and Reeder, {Michael John}",
year = "2009",
doi = "10.1175{\%}2F2009JCLI2777.1",
language = "English",
volume = "22",
pages = "5797 -- 5808",
journal = "Journal of Climate",
issn = "0894-8755",
publisher = "American Meteorological Society",

}

Objective classification of tropical mesoscale convective systems. / Pope, Mick; Jakob, Christian; Reeder, Michael John.

In: Journal of Climate, Vol. 22, 2009, p. 5797 - 5808.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Objective classification of tropical mesoscale convective systems

AU - Pope, Mick

AU - Jakob, Christian

AU - Reeder, Michael John

PY - 2009

Y1 - 2009

N2 - A cluster analysis is applied to the mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) that developed in northern Australia and the surrounding oceans during six wet seasons (September-April) from 1995/96 to 2000/01. During this period, 13 585 MCSs were identified and tracked using an infrared channel (IR1) on the Japanese Meteorological Agency Geostationary Meteorological Satellite 5 (GMS5). Based on the lifetimes of the MCSs, the area covered by cloud, the expansion rate of the cloud, the minimum cloud-top temperature, and their zonal direction of propagation, the MCSs are grouped objectively into four classes. One of the strengths of the analysis is that it objectively condenses a large dataset into a small number of classes, each with its own physical characteristics. MCSs in class 1 (short) are relatively short lived, with 95 having lifetimes less than 5 h, and they are found most frequently over the oceans during the early and late parts of the wet season. MCSs in classes 2 and 3 [long and intermediate west (Int-West)] are longer lived and propagate to the west, developing over continental northwest Australia in deep easterly flow during breaks in the monsoon. These two classes are distinguished principally by their lifetime, with 95 of MCSs in the long class having lifetimes exceeding 4 h. Class 4 (Int-East) comprises MCSs that form over the subtropical latitudes of eastern Australia and in the deep westerly flow over northern parts of the continent during the monsoon and active phases of the MJO.

AB - A cluster analysis is applied to the mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) that developed in northern Australia and the surrounding oceans during six wet seasons (September-April) from 1995/96 to 2000/01. During this period, 13 585 MCSs were identified and tracked using an infrared channel (IR1) on the Japanese Meteorological Agency Geostationary Meteorological Satellite 5 (GMS5). Based on the lifetimes of the MCSs, the area covered by cloud, the expansion rate of the cloud, the minimum cloud-top temperature, and their zonal direction of propagation, the MCSs are grouped objectively into four classes. One of the strengths of the analysis is that it objectively condenses a large dataset into a small number of classes, each with its own physical characteristics. MCSs in class 1 (short) are relatively short lived, with 95 having lifetimes less than 5 h, and they are found most frequently over the oceans during the early and late parts of the wet season. MCSs in classes 2 and 3 [long and intermediate west (Int-West)] are longer lived and propagate to the west, developing over continental northwest Australia in deep easterly flow during breaks in the monsoon. These two classes are distinguished principally by their lifetime, with 95 of MCSs in the long class having lifetimes exceeding 4 h. Class 4 (Int-East) comprises MCSs that form over the subtropical latitudes of eastern Australia and in the deep westerly flow over northern parts of the continent during the monsoon and active phases of the MJO.

UR - http://ams.allenpress.com/perlserv/?request=res-loc&uri=urn%3Aap%3Apdf%3Adoi%3A10.1175%2F2009JCLI2777.1

U2 - 10.1175%2F2009JCLI2777.1

DO - 10.1175%2F2009JCLI2777.1

M3 - Article

VL - 22

SP - 5797

EP - 5808

JO - Journal of Climate

JF - Journal of Climate

SN - 0894-8755

ER -