New insights into the pathogenesis of bladder exstrophy-epispadias complex

Istiak Mahfuz, Tom Darling, Simon Wilkins, Stefan White, Wei Cheng

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Bladder exstrophy-epispadias complex (BEEC) is a complex and debilitating congenital disease. Familial and twin studies suggest a possible genetic component in BEEC pathogenesis. Bladder mesenchyme (detrusor) development requires induction by a signal from bladder urothelium, and we and others have shown the Shh-Gli-Bmp4 signalling pathway is likely to be involved. P63 is a master regulator in epithelial stratification and is expressed in urothelium. We have shown that p63 knock-out mice undergo excessive urothelial apoptosis. Failure of mesenchymal induction by epithelium leads to BEEC. We further demonstrated that insertion/deletion (in/del) polymorphisms (1 base pair (bp) ins and 4 bp ins., and 12 bp del) in the ?NP63 promoter reduce transcriptional efficiency, and are associated with a statistically significant increase in the risk of BEEC in humans. Furthermore, a Genome-Wide Expression Profiling (GWEP) study suggests possible involvement of PERP in human BEEC. Intriguingly, PERP is a direct target of p63 during development, and is also involved in epithelial stratification. PERP co-localizes with desmosome, and both PERP and desmosome are essential for maintaining tissue integrity by cellular adhesion and epithelial stratification. A recent study showed that PERP and desmosome expression levels are abnormal in human BEEC patients. This review describes the role of the P63 > PERP > desmosome pathway in the development of human bladder during embryogenesis. We hypothesize that disruption of this pathway may increase the risk of BEEC.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)996 - 1005
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Pediatric Urology
Volume9
Issue number6 (Part B)
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013

Cite this

Mahfuz, Istiak ; Darling, Tom ; Wilkins, Simon ; White, Stefan ; Cheng, Wei. / New insights into the pathogenesis of bladder exstrophy-epispadias complex. In: Journal of Pediatric Urology. 2013 ; Vol. 9, No. 6 (Part B). pp. 996 - 1005.
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abstract = "Bladder exstrophy-epispadias complex (BEEC) is a complex and debilitating congenital disease. Familial and twin studies suggest a possible genetic component in BEEC pathogenesis. Bladder mesenchyme (detrusor) development requires induction by a signal from bladder urothelium, and we and others have shown the Shh-Gli-Bmp4 signalling pathway is likely to be involved. P63 is a master regulator in epithelial stratification and is expressed in urothelium. We have shown that p63 knock-out mice undergo excessive urothelial apoptosis. Failure of mesenchymal induction by epithelium leads to BEEC. We further demonstrated that insertion/deletion (in/del) polymorphisms (1 base pair (bp) ins and 4 bp ins., and 12 bp del) in the ?NP63 promoter reduce transcriptional efficiency, and are associated with a statistically significant increase in the risk of BEEC in humans. Furthermore, a Genome-Wide Expression Profiling (GWEP) study suggests possible involvement of PERP in human BEEC. Intriguingly, PERP is a direct target of p63 during development, and is also involved in epithelial stratification. PERP co-localizes with desmosome, and both PERP and desmosome are essential for maintaining tissue integrity by cellular adhesion and epithelial stratification. A recent study showed that PERP and desmosome expression levels are abnormal in human BEEC patients. This review describes the role of the P63 > PERP > desmosome pathway in the development of human bladder during embryogenesis. We hypothesize that disruption of this pathway may increase the risk of BEEC.",
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New insights into the pathogenesis of bladder exstrophy-epispadias complex. / Mahfuz, Istiak; Darling, Tom; Wilkins, Simon; White, Stefan; Cheng, Wei.

In: Journal of Pediatric Urology, Vol. 9, No. 6 (Part B), 2013, p. 996 - 1005.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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T1 - New insights into the pathogenesis of bladder exstrophy-epispadias complex

AU - Mahfuz, Istiak

AU - Darling, Tom

AU - Wilkins, Simon

AU - White, Stefan

AU - Cheng, Wei

PY - 2013

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N2 - Bladder exstrophy-epispadias complex (BEEC) is a complex and debilitating congenital disease. Familial and twin studies suggest a possible genetic component in BEEC pathogenesis. Bladder mesenchyme (detrusor) development requires induction by a signal from bladder urothelium, and we and others have shown the Shh-Gli-Bmp4 signalling pathway is likely to be involved. P63 is a master regulator in epithelial stratification and is expressed in urothelium. We have shown that p63 knock-out mice undergo excessive urothelial apoptosis. Failure of mesenchymal induction by epithelium leads to BEEC. We further demonstrated that insertion/deletion (in/del) polymorphisms (1 base pair (bp) ins and 4 bp ins., and 12 bp del) in the ?NP63 promoter reduce transcriptional efficiency, and are associated with a statistically significant increase in the risk of BEEC in humans. Furthermore, a Genome-Wide Expression Profiling (GWEP) study suggests possible involvement of PERP in human BEEC. Intriguingly, PERP is a direct target of p63 during development, and is also involved in epithelial stratification. PERP co-localizes with desmosome, and both PERP and desmosome are essential for maintaining tissue integrity by cellular adhesion and epithelial stratification. A recent study showed that PERP and desmosome expression levels are abnormal in human BEEC patients. This review describes the role of the P63 > PERP > desmosome pathway in the development of human bladder during embryogenesis. We hypothesize that disruption of this pathway may increase the risk of BEEC.

AB - Bladder exstrophy-epispadias complex (BEEC) is a complex and debilitating congenital disease. Familial and twin studies suggest a possible genetic component in BEEC pathogenesis. Bladder mesenchyme (detrusor) development requires induction by a signal from bladder urothelium, and we and others have shown the Shh-Gli-Bmp4 signalling pathway is likely to be involved. P63 is a master regulator in epithelial stratification and is expressed in urothelium. We have shown that p63 knock-out mice undergo excessive urothelial apoptosis. Failure of mesenchymal induction by epithelium leads to BEEC. We further demonstrated that insertion/deletion (in/del) polymorphisms (1 base pair (bp) ins and 4 bp ins., and 12 bp del) in the ?NP63 promoter reduce transcriptional efficiency, and are associated with a statistically significant increase in the risk of BEEC in humans. Furthermore, a Genome-Wide Expression Profiling (GWEP) study suggests possible involvement of PERP in human BEEC. Intriguingly, PERP is a direct target of p63 during development, and is also involved in epithelial stratification. PERP co-localizes with desmosome, and both PERP and desmosome are essential for maintaining tissue integrity by cellular adhesion and epithelial stratification. A recent study showed that PERP and desmosome expression levels are abnormal in human BEEC patients. This review describes the role of the P63 > PERP > desmosome pathway in the development of human bladder during embryogenesis. We hypothesize that disruption of this pathway may increase the risk of BEEC.

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