Neurogenic inflammation in fibromyalgia

Research output: Contribution to journalReview ArticleOtherpeer-review

Abstract

Fibromyalgia is a high impact chronic pain disorder with a well-defined and robust clinical phenotype. Key features include widespread pain and tenderness, high levels of sleep disturbance, fatigue, cognitive dysfunction and emotional distress. Abnormal processing of pain and other sensory input occurs in the brain, spinal cord and periphery and is related to the processes of central and peripheral sensitization. As such, fibromyalgia is deemed to be one of the central sensitivity syndromes. There is increasing evidence of neurogenically derived inflammatory mechanisms occurring in the peripheral tissues, spinal cord and brain in fibromyalgia. These involve a variety of neuropeptides, chemokines and cytokines with activation of both the innate and adaptive immune systems. This process results in several of the peripheral clinical features of fibromyalgia, such as swelling and dysesthesia, and may influence central symptoms, such as fatigue and changes in cognition. In turn, emotional and stress-related physiological mechanisms are seen as upstream drivers of neurogenic inflammation in fibromyalgia.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)291-300
Number of pages10
JournalSeminars in Immunopathology
Volume40
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 May 2018

Keywords

  • Brain
  • Chemokines
  • Cytokines
  • Fibromyalgia
  • Inflammation
  • Neurogenic
  • Neuropeptides
  • Pain

Cite this

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title = "Neurogenic inflammation in fibromyalgia",
abstract = "Fibromyalgia is a high impact chronic pain disorder with a well-defined and robust clinical phenotype. Key features include widespread pain and tenderness, high levels of sleep disturbance, fatigue, cognitive dysfunction and emotional distress. Abnormal processing of pain and other sensory input occurs in the brain, spinal cord and periphery and is related to the processes of central and peripheral sensitization. As such, fibromyalgia is deemed to be one of the central sensitivity syndromes. There is increasing evidence of neurogenically derived inflammatory mechanisms occurring in the peripheral tissues, spinal cord and brain in fibromyalgia. These involve a variety of neuropeptides, chemokines and cytokines with activation of both the innate and adaptive immune systems. This process results in several of the peripheral clinical features of fibromyalgia, such as swelling and dysesthesia, and may influence central symptoms, such as fatigue and changes in cognition. In turn, emotional and stress-related physiological mechanisms are seen as upstream drivers of neurogenic inflammation in fibromyalgia.",
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Neurogenic inflammation in fibromyalgia. / Littlejohn, Geoffrey; Guymer, Emma.

In: Seminars in Immunopathology, Vol. 40, No. 3, 01.05.2018, p. 291-300.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview ArticleOtherpeer-review

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AU - Littlejohn, Geoffrey

AU - Guymer, Emma

PY - 2018/5/1

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AB - Fibromyalgia is a high impact chronic pain disorder with a well-defined and robust clinical phenotype. Key features include widespread pain and tenderness, high levels of sleep disturbance, fatigue, cognitive dysfunction and emotional distress. Abnormal processing of pain and other sensory input occurs in the brain, spinal cord and periphery and is related to the processes of central and peripheral sensitization. As such, fibromyalgia is deemed to be one of the central sensitivity syndromes. There is increasing evidence of neurogenically derived inflammatory mechanisms occurring in the peripheral tissues, spinal cord and brain in fibromyalgia. These involve a variety of neuropeptides, chemokines and cytokines with activation of both the innate and adaptive immune systems. This process results in several of the peripheral clinical features of fibromyalgia, such as swelling and dysesthesia, and may influence central symptoms, such as fatigue and changes in cognition. In turn, emotional and stress-related physiological mechanisms are seen as upstream drivers of neurogenic inflammation in fibromyalgia.

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KW - Inflammation

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