Neck pain

What if it is not musculoskeletal?

Nirosen Vijiaratnam, David R.R. Williams, Kelly Bertram

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleOtherpeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Neck pain is a common presentation in general practice, with muscle strain or osteoarthritis the most common diagnoses. A systematic approach for identifying red flags for alternative causes is required to appropriately investigate or refer for specialist opinion. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this article is to highlight features of neurological and other causes of neck pain in adults that may present in general practice, and to outline a quick and practical diagnostic approach. DISCUSSION: Neck pain in adults may result from musculoskeletal or neurological disease, or as a component of a wide variety of metabolic, infective or malignant disorders. Focused attention to those components of history and examination that suggest alternative conditions can assist the diagnostic process.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)279-282
Number of pages4
JournalAustralian Journal of General Practice
Volume47
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2018

Cite this

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Neck pain : What if it is not musculoskeletal? / Vijiaratnam, Nirosen; Williams, David R.R.; Bertram, Kelly.

In: Australian Journal of General Practice, Vol. 47, No. 5, 05.2018, p. 279-282.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleOtherpeer-review

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