Mucosal healing in Crohn's disease: a systematic review

Peter De Cruz, Michael A Kamm, Lani Prideaux, Patrick B Allen, Gregory Thomas Charles Moore

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

93 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The traditional goals of Crohn s disease therapy, to induce and maintain clinical remission, have not clearly changed its natural history. In contrast, emerging evidence suggests that achieving and maintaining mucosal healing may alter the natural history of Crohn s disease, as it has been associated with more sustained clinical remission and reduced rates of hospitalization and surgical resection. Induction and maintenance of mucosal healing should therefore be a goal toward which therapy is now directed. Unresolved issues pertain to the benefit of achieving mucosal healing at different stages of the disease, the relationship between mucosal healing and transmural inflammation, the intensity of treatment needed to achieve mucosal healing when it has not been obtained using standard therapy, and the means by which mucosal healing is defined using current endoscopic disease activity indices. The main clinical challenge relates to defining the means of achieving high rates of mucosal healing in clinical practice.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)429 - 444
Number of pages16
JournalInflammatory Bowel Diseases
Volume19
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013

Cite this

Cruz, Peter De ; Kamm, Michael A ; Prideaux, Lani ; Allen, Patrick B ; Moore, Gregory Thomas Charles. / Mucosal healing in Crohn's disease: a systematic review. In: Inflammatory Bowel Diseases. 2013 ; Vol. 19, No. 2. pp. 429 - 444.
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Cruz, PD, Kamm, MA, Prideaux, L, Allen, PB & Moore, GTC 2013, 'Mucosal healing in Crohn's disease: a systematic review', Inflammatory Bowel Diseases, vol. 19, no. 2, pp. 429 - 444. https://doi.org/10.1002/ibd.22977

Mucosal healing in Crohn's disease: a systematic review. / Cruz, Peter De; Kamm, Michael A; Prideaux, Lani; Allen, Patrick B; Moore, Gregory Thomas Charles.

In: Inflammatory Bowel Diseases, Vol. 19, No. 2, 2013, p. 429 - 444.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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