Motor cortical excitability and inhibition in acquired mirror pain

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Mirror pain describes when the observation of another s pain experience induces a personal experience of pain. It has been suggested that mirror pain could result from changes in neural excitability or inhibition. In this study we used transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to investigate motor cortical excitability in lower-limb amputees who experience mirror pain. Using paired-pulse TMS to assess motor cortical inhibition (CI) and cortical facilitation (CF), recordings were taken from the right first dorsal interosseus in lower-limb amputees who experience mirror pain (MP+), lower-limb amputees who do not experience mirror pain (MP-), and non-amputee controls. No differences in CI or CF were observed between the MP+ and both control groups. Thus, when not paired with a pain-related stimulus, changes in motor cortical excitability do not appear to contribute to the experience of mirror pain in lower-limb amputees.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)161 - 165
Number of pages5
JournalNeuroscience Letters
Volume530
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012

Cite this

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title = "Motor cortical excitability and inhibition in acquired mirror pain",
abstract = "Mirror pain describes when the observation of another s pain experience induces a personal experience of pain. It has been suggested that mirror pain could result from changes in neural excitability or inhibition. In this study we used transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to investigate motor cortical excitability in lower-limb amputees who experience mirror pain. Using paired-pulse TMS to assess motor cortical inhibition (CI) and cortical facilitation (CF), recordings were taken from the right first dorsal interosseus in lower-limb amputees who experience mirror pain (MP+), lower-limb amputees who do not experience mirror pain (MP-), and non-amputee controls. No differences in CI or CF were observed between the MP+ and both control groups. Thus, when not paired with a pain-related stimulus, changes in motor cortical excitability do not appear to contribute to the experience of mirror pain in lower-limb amputees.",
author = "Bernadette Fitzgibbon and Enticott, {Peter Gregory} and Bradshaw, {John Lockyer} and Giummarra, {Melita Joy} and Nellie Georgiou-Karistianis and Michael Chou and Fitzgerald, {Paul Bernard}",
year = "2012",
doi = "10.1016/j.neulet.2012.09.036",
language = "English",
volume = "530",
pages = "161 -- 165",
journal = "Neuroscience Letters",
issn = "0304-3940",
publisher = "Elsevier",
number = "2",

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TY - JOUR

T1 - Motor cortical excitability and inhibition in acquired mirror pain

AU - Fitzgibbon, Bernadette

AU - Enticott, Peter Gregory

AU - Bradshaw, John Lockyer

AU - Giummarra, Melita Joy

AU - Georgiou-Karistianis, Nellie

AU - Chou, Michael

AU - Fitzgerald, Paul Bernard

PY - 2012

Y1 - 2012

N2 - Mirror pain describes when the observation of another s pain experience induces a personal experience of pain. It has been suggested that mirror pain could result from changes in neural excitability or inhibition. In this study we used transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to investigate motor cortical excitability in lower-limb amputees who experience mirror pain. Using paired-pulse TMS to assess motor cortical inhibition (CI) and cortical facilitation (CF), recordings were taken from the right first dorsal interosseus in lower-limb amputees who experience mirror pain (MP+), lower-limb amputees who do not experience mirror pain (MP-), and non-amputee controls. No differences in CI or CF were observed between the MP+ and both control groups. Thus, when not paired with a pain-related stimulus, changes in motor cortical excitability do not appear to contribute to the experience of mirror pain in lower-limb amputees.

AB - Mirror pain describes when the observation of another s pain experience induces a personal experience of pain. It has been suggested that mirror pain could result from changes in neural excitability or inhibition. In this study we used transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to investigate motor cortical excitability in lower-limb amputees who experience mirror pain. Using paired-pulse TMS to assess motor cortical inhibition (CI) and cortical facilitation (CF), recordings were taken from the right first dorsal interosseus in lower-limb amputees who experience mirror pain (MP+), lower-limb amputees who do not experience mirror pain (MP-), and non-amputee controls. No differences in CI or CF were observed between the MP+ and both control groups. Thus, when not paired with a pain-related stimulus, changes in motor cortical excitability do not appear to contribute to the experience of mirror pain in lower-limb amputees.

UR - http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0304394012012700

U2 - 10.1016/j.neulet.2012.09.036

DO - 10.1016/j.neulet.2012.09.036

M3 - Article

VL - 530

SP - 161

EP - 165

JO - Neuroscience Letters

JF - Neuroscience Letters

SN - 0304-3940

IS - 2

ER -