‘More effort and more time.’ Considerations in the establishment of interprofessional education programs in the workplace

Fiona Kent, Katrina Nankervis, Christina Johnson, Marisa Hodgkinson, Julie Baulch, Terry Haines

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

The argument for integrating interprofessional education (IPE) activities into the workplace has been made concurrently with the call for collaborative clinical practice. An exploratory case study investigation of existing activities in a large metropolitan health care network was undertaken to inform the development of future IPE initiatives. Purposive sampling invited clinicians involved in the design or delivery of workplace IPE activities to participate in a semi-structured interview to discuss their existing programs and the opportunities and challenges facing future work. Interviews were audiotaped, transcribed and thematically analysed. In total, 15 clinicians were interviewed representing medicine, nursing, occupational therapy, pharmacy, physiotherapy, psychology, social work and speech pathology. The IPE programs identified included one medical and midwifery student workshop, several dedicated new graduate or intern programs combining the professions and multiple continuing professional development programs. Three dominant themes were identified to inform the development of future work: clinician factors, organisational factors and IPE considerations. In addition to the cultural, physical and logistical challenges associated with education that integrates professions in the workplace, the time required for the design and delivery of integrated team training should be accounted for when establishing such programs. Considerations for sustainability include ongoing investment in education skills for clinicians, establishment of dedicated education roles and expansion of existing education activities.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)89-94
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Interprofessional Care
Volume32
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2 Jan 2018

Keywords

  • continuing education
  • Interprofessional education
  • interviews
  • qualitative method
  • workplace learning

Cite this

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‘More effort and more time.’ Considerations in the establishment of interprofessional education programs in the workplace. / Kent, Fiona; Nankervis, Katrina; Johnson, Christina; Hodgkinson, Marisa ; Baulch, Julie; Haines, Terry.

In: Journal of Interprofessional Care, Vol. 32, No. 1, 02.01.2018, p. 89-94.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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