Moral identity and emotion in athletes

Maria Kavussanu, Adrian Willoughby, Christopher Ring

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of moral identity on physiological responses to affective pictures, namely, the startle blink reflex and painrelated evoked potential. Male (n = 48) and female (n = 46) athletes participating in contact team sports were randomly assigned to either a moral identity group or a non-moral identity group and viewed a series of unpleasant, neutral, and pleasant sport-specific pictures. During picture viewing, a noxious electrocutaneous stimulus was delivered as the startle probe and the startle blink and pain-related evoked potential were measured. Upon completion of physiological measures, participants reviewed the pictures and rated them for valence and arousal. ANOVAs revealed that participants in the moral identity group displayed larger startle blinks and smaller pain-related potentials than did those in the non-moral identity group across all picture valence categories. However, the difference in the magnitude of startle blinks between the moral and non-moral identity groups was larger in response to unpleasant than pleasant and neutral pictures. Our findings suggest that moral identity affects physiological responses to sport-specific affective pictures, thereby providing objective evidence for the link between moral identity and emotion in athletes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)695-714
Number of pages20
JournalJournal of Sport and Exercise Psychology
Volume34
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Affect
  • Pain-related evoked potential
  • Priming
  • Startle blink

Cite this