Models of 'obesity' in large animals and birds

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Abstract

Most laboratory-based research on obesity is carried out in rodents, but there are a number of other interesting models in the animal kingdom that are instructive. This includes domesticated animal species such as pigs and sheep, as well as wild, migrating and hibernating species. Larger animals allow particular experimental manipulations that are not possible in smaller animals and especially useful models have been developed to address issues such as manipulation of fetal development. Although some of the most well-studied models are ruminants, with metabolic control that differs from monogastrics, the general principles of metabolic regulation still pertain. It is possible to obtain much more accurate endocrine profiles in larger animals and this has provided important data in relation to leptin and ghrelin physiology. Genetic models have been created in domesticated animals through selection and these complement those of the laboratory rodent. This short review highlights particular areas of research in domesticated and wild species that expand our knowledge of systems that are important for our understanding of obesity and metabolism.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationObesity and Metabolism
EditorsMarta Korbonits
Place of PublicationBasel Switzerland
PublisherKarger
Pages107-117
Number of pages11
Edition1st
ISBN (Print)9783805584296
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2007

Publication series

NameFrontiers of Hormone Research
Volume36
ISSN (Print)0301-3073

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