Minimizing bushfire risk through optimal powerline assets replacement and improvement

R Roozbahani, C Huston, S Dunstall, Babak Abbasi, A Ernst, S Schreider

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference PaperResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Fires initiated by powerline faults disproportionately are associated with a majority of bushfire fatalities in South-Eastern Australia. Over 150 deaths have occurred since 1977 in South-Eastern Australia. A response from governments and utilities has been to embark on electricity asset improvement and replacement programs where the definition of improvement is tied to an aim of reducing powerline sparked ignitions under the most dangerous meteorological conditions for fire. This paper introduces an optimization model which provides a strategy for adding technologies to powerline distribution assets such that there are improvements interms fire risk being lowered. The goal of the model is to minimize financial outlay while the risk of electricity sparked bushfire incidence is a solid constraint in the model, set to mimic potential bushfire risk reduction target scenarios. Currently, strategies for targeting investment in improvement of the electrical distribution system have not used such a mathematically based optimization approach. Instead they are based on expert interpretation of risk maps which visualize risk of fault of asset technologies with the consequence of fire starts at the same locations. Application of an optimization model by government and utilities when investing in powerline improvements could lead to reduced bushfire impacts within given funding frameworks relative to current practice. Estimated fault and fire ignition behavior of current and proposed electrical asset technology are a basis for our model. Fire mitigating treatments can range from the installation of new electrical fault detection systems at zone sub-stations; burying individual sections of powerline; installation of automatic circuit reclosers (ACRs); adjusting the settings on existing ACRs; insulating bare lines; etc. The work here represents a natural extension of bushfire risk-modelling work being undertaken by the authors in collaboration with the Victorian Government’s Powerline Bushfire Safety Program (PBSP).
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationMODSIM2015, 21st International Congress on Modelling and Simulation
EditorsRobert Anderssen, Tony Weber, Malcolm McPhee
Place of PublicationAustralia
PublisherModelling and Simulation Society of Australia and New Zealand
Pages1834-1840
Number of pages7
ISBN (Electronic)9780987214355
Publication statusPublished - 2015
Externally publishedYes
EventInternational Congress on Modelling and Simulation 2015: Partnering with industry and the community for innovation and impact through modelling - Gold Coast Convention and Exhibition Centre, Broadbeach, Australia
Duration: 29 Nov 20154 Dec 2015
Conference number: 21st
https://web.archive.org/web/20150627050926/http://www.mssanz.org.au:80/modsim2015/
https://web.archive.org/web/20150626200712/http://mssanz.org.au:80/modsim2015/index.html

Conference

ConferenceInternational Congress on Modelling and Simulation 2015
Abbreviated titleMODSIM2015
CountryAustralia
CityBroadbeach
Period29/11/154/12/15
OtherThe 21st International Congress on Modelling and Simulation (MODSIM2015) was held at the Gold Coast Convention and Exhibition Centre, Broadbeach, Queensland, Australia from Sunday 29 November to Friday 4 December 2015.

It was held jointly with the 23rd National Conference of the Australian Society for Operations Research and the DSTO led Defence Operations Research Symposium (DORS 2015).

The theme for this event was Partnering with industry and the community for innovation and impact through modelling.
Internet address

Keywords

  • Bushfire risk
  • mixed-integer programming
  • powerline safety
  • combinatorial optimization

Cite this

Roozbahani, R., Huston, C., Dunstall, S., Abbasi, B., Ernst, A., & Schreider, S. (2015). Minimizing bushfire risk through optimal powerline assets replacement and improvement. In R. Anderssen, T. Weber, & M. McPhee (Eds.), MODSIM2015, 21st International Congress on Modelling and Simulation (pp. 1834-1840). Australia: Modelling and Simulation Society of Australia and New Zealand.
Roozbahani, R ; Huston, C ; Dunstall, S ; Abbasi, Babak ; Ernst, A ; Schreider, S. / Minimizing bushfire risk through optimal powerline assets replacement and improvement. MODSIM2015, 21st International Congress on Modelling and Simulation. editor / Robert Anderssen ; Tony Weber ; Malcolm McPhee. Australia : Modelling and Simulation Society of Australia and New Zealand, 2015. pp. 1834-1840
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abstract = "Fires initiated by powerline faults disproportionately are associated with a majority of bushfire fatalities in South-Eastern Australia. Over 150 deaths have occurred since 1977 in South-Eastern Australia. A response from governments and utilities has been to embark on electricity asset improvement and replacement programs where the definition of improvement is tied to an aim of reducing powerline sparked ignitions under the most dangerous meteorological conditions for fire. This paper introduces an optimization model which provides a strategy for adding technologies to powerline distribution assets such that there are improvements interms fire risk being lowered. The goal of the model is to minimize financial outlay while the risk of electricity sparked bushfire incidence is a solid constraint in the model, set to mimic potential bushfire risk reduction target scenarios. Currently, strategies for targeting investment in improvement of the electrical distribution system have not used such a mathematically based optimization approach. Instead they are based on expert interpretation of risk maps which visualize risk of fault of asset technologies with the consequence of fire starts at the same locations. Application of an optimization model by government and utilities when investing in powerline improvements could lead to reduced bushfire impacts within given funding frameworks relative to current practice. Estimated fault and fire ignition behavior of current and proposed electrical asset technology are a basis for our model. Fire mitigating treatments can range from the installation of new electrical fault detection systems at zone sub-stations; burying individual sections of powerline; installation of automatic circuit reclosers (ACRs); adjusting the settings on existing ACRs; insulating bare lines; etc. The work here represents a natural extension of bushfire risk-modelling work being undertaken by the authors in collaboration with the Victorian Government’s Powerline Bushfire Safety Program (PBSP).",
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Roozbahani, R, Huston, C, Dunstall, S, Abbasi, B, Ernst, A & Schreider, S 2015, Minimizing bushfire risk through optimal powerline assets replacement and improvement. in R Anderssen, T Weber & M McPhee (eds), MODSIM2015, 21st International Congress on Modelling and Simulation. Modelling and Simulation Society of Australia and New Zealand, Australia, pp. 1834-1840, International Congress on Modelling and Simulation 2015, Broadbeach, Australia, 29/11/15.

Minimizing bushfire risk through optimal powerline assets replacement and improvement. / Roozbahani, R; Huston, C; Dunstall, S; Abbasi, Babak; Ernst, A; Schreider, S.

MODSIM2015, 21st International Congress on Modelling and Simulation. ed. / Robert Anderssen; Tony Weber; Malcolm McPhee. Australia : Modelling and Simulation Society of Australia and New Zealand, 2015. p. 1834-1840.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference PaperResearchpeer-review

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Roozbahani R, Huston C, Dunstall S, Abbasi B, Ernst A, Schreider S. Minimizing bushfire risk through optimal powerline assets replacement and improvement. In Anderssen R, Weber T, McPhee M, editors, MODSIM2015, 21st International Congress on Modelling and Simulation. Australia: Modelling and Simulation Society of Australia and New Zealand. 2015. p. 1834-1840