Microelectronic retinal prosthesis

II. Use of high-voltage CMOS in retinal neurostimulators

N. Dommel, Y. T. Wong, T. Lehmann, P. Byrnes-Preston, N. H. Lovell, G. J. Suaning

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference PaperResearchpeer-review

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper presents the design, implementation, and simulated and measured results of a complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor neurostimulator implemented in a 0.35 μm high-voltage process. To allow for a high stimulation voltage, and hence the greatest versatility of the neurostimulator in situ, a high-voltage CMOS process was used. The neurostimulator utilized current sources and sinks to simultaneously deliver and recover charge. It has the ability to deliver stimulus in three output current ranges using a current sink only, current source only, or both a current source and sink combined to provide focused stimulation. The worst case integral non-linearity and differential non-linearity errors were 0.2 LSB and 0.1 LSB respectively, and the current source and sink turn-on times were under 500 ns, providing fast switching time in response to stimuli instructions. The total die area was under 13 mm 2, well within the area constraints of our implantable vision prosthesis device.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication28th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBS'06
PublisherIEEE, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers
Pages4651-4654
Number of pages4
ISBN (Print)1424400325, 9781424400324
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2006
Externally publishedYes
Event28th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBS'06 - New York, NY, United States of America
Duration: 30 Aug 20063 Sep 2006

Publication series

NameAnnual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology - Proceedings
ISSN (Print)0589-1019

Conference

Conference28th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBS'06
CountryUnited States of America
CityNew York, NY
Period30/08/063/09/06

Keywords

  • Digital-to-analog converter (DAC)
  • High-voltage CMOS
  • Parallel neural stimulation
  • Vision prosthesis

Cite this

Dommel, N., Wong, Y. T., Lehmann, T., Byrnes-Preston, P., Lovell, N. H., & Suaning, G. J. (2006). Microelectronic retinal prosthesis: II. Use of high-voltage CMOS in retinal neurostimulators. In 28th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBS'06 (pp. 4651-4654). [4029968] (Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology - Proceedings). IEEE, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. https://doi.org/10.1109/IEMBS.2006.259605
Dommel, N. ; Wong, Y. T. ; Lehmann, T. ; Byrnes-Preston, P. ; Lovell, N. H. ; Suaning, G. J. / Microelectronic retinal prosthesis : II. Use of high-voltage CMOS in retinal neurostimulators. 28th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBS'06. IEEE, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, 2006. pp. 4651-4654 (Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology - Proceedings).
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abstract = "This paper presents the design, implementation, and simulated and measured results of a complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor neurostimulator implemented in a 0.35 μm high-voltage process. To allow for a high stimulation voltage, and hence the greatest versatility of the neurostimulator in situ, a high-voltage CMOS process was used. The neurostimulator utilized current sources and sinks to simultaneously deliver and recover charge. It has the ability to deliver stimulus in three output current ranges using a current sink only, current source only, or both a current source and sink combined to provide focused stimulation. The worst case integral non-linearity and differential non-linearity errors were 0.2 LSB and 0.1 LSB respectively, and the current source and sink turn-on times were under 500 ns, providing fast switching time in response to stimuli instructions. The total die area was under 13 mm 2, well within the area constraints of our implantable vision prosthesis device.",
keywords = "Digital-to-analog converter (DAC), High-voltage CMOS, Parallel neural stimulation, Vision prosthesis",
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Dommel, N, Wong, YT, Lehmann, T, Byrnes-Preston, P, Lovell, NH & Suaning, GJ 2006, Microelectronic retinal prosthesis: II. Use of high-voltage CMOS in retinal neurostimulators. in 28th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBS'06., 4029968, Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology - Proceedings, IEEE, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, pp. 4651-4654, 28th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBS'06, New York, NY, United States of America, 30/08/06. https://doi.org/10.1109/IEMBS.2006.259605

Microelectronic retinal prosthesis : II. Use of high-voltage CMOS in retinal neurostimulators. / Dommel, N.; Wong, Y. T.; Lehmann, T.; Byrnes-Preston, P.; Lovell, N. H.; Suaning, G. J.

28th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBS'06. IEEE, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, 2006. p. 4651-4654 4029968 (Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology - Proceedings).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference PaperResearchpeer-review

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AB - This paper presents the design, implementation, and simulated and measured results of a complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor neurostimulator implemented in a 0.35 μm high-voltage process. To allow for a high stimulation voltage, and hence the greatest versatility of the neurostimulator in situ, a high-voltage CMOS process was used. The neurostimulator utilized current sources and sinks to simultaneously deliver and recover charge. It has the ability to deliver stimulus in three output current ranges using a current sink only, current source only, or both a current source and sink combined to provide focused stimulation. The worst case integral non-linearity and differential non-linearity errors were 0.2 LSB and 0.1 LSB respectively, and the current source and sink turn-on times were under 500 ns, providing fast switching time in response to stimuli instructions. The total die area was under 13 mm 2, well within the area constraints of our implantable vision prosthesis device.

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Dommel N, Wong YT, Lehmann T, Byrnes-Preston P, Lovell NH, Suaning GJ. Microelectronic retinal prosthesis: II. Use of high-voltage CMOS in retinal neurostimulators. In 28th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBS'06. IEEE, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. 2006. p. 4651-4654. 4029968. (Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology - Proceedings). https://doi.org/10.1109/IEMBS.2006.259605