Mental health trajectories among women in Australia as they age

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Objectives: To ascertain the trajectories of mental health among women in Australia assessed in repeat waves from their early 70 s to the end of their lives or their mid 80 s. Method: Secondary analysis of data contributed by the 1921–26 cohort of the Australian Longitudinal Study of Women's Health Waves 1–6. Primary outcome was the 4-item SF-36 Vitality Subscale, which assesses mental health as life satisfaction, social participation, energy and enthusiasm. Structural, individual and intermediary factors were assessed using study-specific and standardised measures. Trajectories were identified using Growth Mixture Modelling and associations with baseline characteristics with Structural Equation Modelling. Results: 12,432 women completed Survey One. Three mental health trajectories: stable high (77%); stable low (18.2%) and declining from high to low (4.8%) were identified. Compared to the stable high group, women in the stable low group were significantly less physically active, had more nutritional risks, more recent adverse life events, fewer social interactions and less social support, reported more stress and were more likely to have a serious illness or disability at Survey One. The declining group had similar characteristics to the stable high group, but were significantly more likely to report at baseline that they had experienced recent financial, physical and emotional elder abuse. These interact, but not directly with socioeconomic position and marital status. Conclusion: Mental health among older women is related to social relationships, general health, access to physical activity and healthy nutrition, coincidental adverse life events and experiences of interpersonal violence, in particular elder abuse.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)887-896
Number of pages10
JournalAging and Mental Health
Volume23
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019

Keywords

  • Aging
  • Australia
  • mental health
  • trajectory
  • women

Cite this

@article{59d00458582446e3ac14de4bdf53b613,
title = "Mental health trajectories among women in Australia as they age",
abstract = "Objectives: To ascertain the trajectories of mental health among women in Australia assessed in repeat waves from their early 70 s to the end of their lives or their mid 80 s. Method: Secondary analysis of data contributed by the 1921–26 cohort of the Australian Longitudinal Study of Women's Health Waves 1–6. Primary outcome was the 4-item SF-36 Vitality Subscale, which assesses mental health as life satisfaction, social participation, energy and enthusiasm. Structural, individual and intermediary factors were assessed using study-specific and standardised measures. Trajectories were identified using Growth Mixture Modelling and associations with baseline characteristics with Structural Equation Modelling. Results: 12,432 women completed Survey One. Three mental health trajectories: stable high (77{\%}); stable low (18.2{\%}) and declining from high to low (4.8{\%}) were identified. Compared to the stable high group, women in the stable low group were significantly less physically active, had more nutritional risks, more recent adverse life events, fewer social interactions and less social support, reported more stress and were more likely to have a serious illness or disability at Survey One. The declining group had similar characteristics to the stable high group, but were significantly more likely to report at baseline that they had experienced recent financial, physical and emotional elder abuse. These interact, but not directly with socioeconomic position and marital status. Conclusion: Mental health among older women is related to social relationships, general health, access to physical activity and healthy nutrition, coincidental adverse life events and experiences of interpersonal violence, in particular elder abuse.",
keywords = "Aging, Australia, mental health, trajectory, women",
author = "Thach Tran and Karin Hammarberg and Joanne Ryan and Judy Lowthian and Rosanne Freak-Poli and Alice Owen and Maggie Kirkman and Andrea Curtis and Heather Rowe and Helen Brown and Stephanie Ward and Carlene Britt and Jane Fisher",
year = "2019",
doi = "10.1080/13607863.2018.1474445",
language = "English",
volume = "23",
pages = "887--896",
journal = "Aging and Mental Health",
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number = "7",

}

Mental health trajectories among women in Australia as they age. / Tran, Thach; Hammarberg, Karin; Ryan, Joanne; Lowthian, Judy; Freak-Poli, Rosanne; Owen, Alice; Kirkman, Maggie; Curtis, Andrea; Rowe, Heather; Brown, Helen; Ward, Stephanie; Britt, Carlene; Fisher, Jane.

In: Aging and Mental Health, Vol. 23, No. 7, 2019, p. 887-896.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Mental health trajectories among women in Australia as they age

AU - Tran, Thach

AU - Hammarberg, Karin

AU - Ryan, Joanne

AU - Lowthian, Judy

AU - Freak-Poli, Rosanne

AU - Owen, Alice

AU - Kirkman, Maggie

AU - Curtis, Andrea

AU - Rowe, Heather

AU - Brown, Helen

AU - Ward, Stephanie

AU - Britt, Carlene

AU - Fisher, Jane

PY - 2019

Y1 - 2019

N2 - Objectives: To ascertain the trajectories of mental health among women in Australia assessed in repeat waves from their early 70 s to the end of their lives or their mid 80 s. Method: Secondary analysis of data contributed by the 1921–26 cohort of the Australian Longitudinal Study of Women's Health Waves 1–6. Primary outcome was the 4-item SF-36 Vitality Subscale, which assesses mental health as life satisfaction, social participation, energy and enthusiasm. Structural, individual and intermediary factors were assessed using study-specific and standardised measures. Trajectories were identified using Growth Mixture Modelling and associations with baseline characteristics with Structural Equation Modelling. Results: 12,432 women completed Survey One. Three mental health trajectories: stable high (77%); stable low (18.2%) and declining from high to low (4.8%) were identified. Compared to the stable high group, women in the stable low group were significantly less physically active, had more nutritional risks, more recent adverse life events, fewer social interactions and less social support, reported more stress and were more likely to have a serious illness or disability at Survey One. The declining group had similar characteristics to the stable high group, but were significantly more likely to report at baseline that they had experienced recent financial, physical and emotional elder abuse. These interact, but not directly with socioeconomic position and marital status. Conclusion: Mental health among older women is related to social relationships, general health, access to physical activity and healthy nutrition, coincidental adverse life events and experiences of interpersonal violence, in particular elder abuse.

AB - Objectives: To ascertain the trajectories of mental health among women in Australia assessed in repeat waves from their early 70 s to the end of their lives or their mid 80 s. Method: Secondary analysis of data contributed by the 1921–26 cohort of the Australian Longitudinal Study of Women's Health Waves 1–6. Primary outcome was the 4-item SF-36 Vitality Subscale, which assesses mental health as life satisfaction, social participation, energy and enthusiasm. Structural, individual and intermediary factors were assessed using study-specific and standardised measures. Trajectories were identified using Growth Mixture Modelling and associations with baseline characteristics with Structural Equation Modelling. Results: 12,432 women completed Survey One. Three mental health trajectories: stable high (77%); stable low (18.2%) and declining from high to low (4.8%) were identified. Compared to the stable high group, women in the stable low group were significantly less physically active, had more nutritional risks, more recent adverse life events, fewer social interactions and less social support, reported more stress and were more likely to have a serious illness or disability at Survey One. The declining group had similar characteristics to the stable high group, but were significantly more likely to report at baseline that they had experienced recent financial, physical and emotional elder abuse. These interact, but not directly with socioeconomic position and marital status. Conclusion: Mental health among older women is related to social relationships, general health, access to physical activity and healthy nutrition, coincidental adverse life events and experiences of interpersonal violence, in particular elder abuse.

KW - Aging

KW - Australia

KW - mental health

KW - trajectory

KW - women

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U2 - 10.1080/13607863.2018.1474445

DO - 10.1080/13607863.2018.1474445

M3 - Article

VL - 23

SP - 887

EP - 896

JO - Aging and Mental Health

JF - Aging and Mental Health

SN - 1360-7863

IS - 7

ER -