Mental health literacy for children with a parent with a mental illness

Joanne Riebschleger, Christine Grove, Shane Costello, Daniel Cavanaugh

Research output: Contribution to journalReview ArticleResearch

Abstract

Promoting mental health literacy is an effective strategy to protect the wellbeing of parents with mental illness and their children. Mental health literacy is part of health literacy; it is defined as “one’s level of understanding about mental health attitudes and conditions, as well as one’s ability to prevent, recognize, and cope with these conditions” (Jorm et al., 1997 p. 182). Mental health literacy can be developed by mental health providers discussing mental illness, recovery, and coping with parents and family members, including children. Increased mental health literacy leads to engagement in mental health promotion and (for the child) prevention focused activities (Beardslee, Solantaus, Morgan, Gladstone, & Kowalenko, 2013).
LanguageEnglish
Pages1-3
Number of pages3
JournalJournal of Parent and Family Mental Health
Volume3
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018

Cite this

Riebschleger, Joanne ; Grove, Christine ; Costello, Shane ; Cavanaugh, Daniel . / Mental health literacy for children with a parent with a mental illness. In: Journal of Parent and Family Mental Health. 2018 ; Vol. 3, No. 1. pp. 1-3.
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Mental health literacy for children with a parent with a mental illness. / Riebschleger, Joanne; Grove, Christine; Costello, Shane; Cavanaugh, Daniel .

In: Journal of Parent and Family Mental Health, Vol. 3, No. 1, 2018, p. 1-3.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview ArticleResearch

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AU - Grove, Christine

AU - Costello, Shane

AU - Cavanaugh, Daniel

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