Medium-term outcome of fundoplication after lung transplantation.

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25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in lung transplant recipients has gained increasing attention as a factor in allograft failure. There are few data on the impact of fundoplication on survival or lung function, and less on its effect on symptoms or quality of life. Patients undergoing fundoplication following lung transplantation from 1999 to 2005 were included in the study. Patient satisfaction, changes in GERD symptoms, and the presence of known side effects were assessed. The effect on lung function, body mass index, and rate of progression to the bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS) were recorded. Twenty-one patients (13 males), in whom reflux was confirmed on objective criteria, were included, with a mean age of 43 years (range 20a??68). Time between transplantation and fundoplication was 768 days (range 145a??1524). The indication for fundoplication was suspected microaspiration in 13 and symptoms of GERD in 8. There was one perioperative death, at day 17. There were three other late deaths. Fundoplication did not appear to affect progression to BOS stage 1, although it may have slowed progression to stage 2 and 3. Forced expiratory volume-1 predicted was 72.9 (20.9), 6 months prior to fundoplication and 70.4 (26.8), six months post-fundoplication, P= 0.33. Body mass index decreased significantly in the 6 months following fundoplication (23 kg/m2 vs. 21 kg/m2, P= 0.05). Patients were satisfied with the outcome of the fundoplication (mean satisfaction score 8.8 out of 10). Prevalence of GERD symptoms decreased significantly following surgery (11 of 14 vs. 4 of 17, P= 0.002).
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)642 - 648
Number of pages7
JournalDiseases of the Esophagus
Volume22
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009

Cite this

@article{265cb49989d540c3996a1b03afa417a5,
title = "Medium-term outcome of fundoplication after lung transplantation.",
abstract = "Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in lung transplant recipients has gained increasing attention as a factor in allograft failure. There are few data on the impact of fundoplication on survival or lung function, and less on its effect on symptoms or quality of life. Patients undergoing fundoplication following lung transplantation from 1999 to 2005 were included in the study. Patient satisfaction, changes in GERD symptoms, and the presence of known side effects were assessed. The effect on lung function, body mass index, and rate of progression to the bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS) were recorded. Twenty-one patients (13 males), in whom reflux was confirmed on objective criteria, were included, with a mean age of 43 years (range 20a??68). Time between transplantation and fundoplication was 768 days (range 145a??1524). The indication for fundoplication was suspected microaspiration in 13 and symptoms of GERD in 8. There was one perioperative death, at day 17. There were three other late deaths. Fundoplication did not appear to affect progression to BOS stage 1, although it may have slowed progression to stage 2 and 3. Forced expiratory volume-1 predicted was 72.9 (20.9), 6 months prior to fundoplication and 70.4 (26.8), six months post-fundoplication, P= 0.33. Body mass index decreased significantly in the 6 months following fundoplication (23 kg/m2 vs. 21 kg/m2, P= 0.05). Patients were satisfied with the outcome of the fundoplication (mean satisfaction score 8.8 out of 10). Prevalence of GERD symptoms decreased significantly following surgery (11 of 14 vs. 4 of 17, P= 0.002).",
author = "Burton, {Paul Robert} and Brenda Button and Brown, {Wendy Ann} and Min-Jae Lee and Stuart Roberts and Sayed Hassen and Bailey, {Michael John} and Smith, {Andrew Ian} and Snell, {Gregory I}",
year = "2009",
doi = "10.1111/j.1442-2050.2009.00980.x",
language = "English",
volume = "22",
pages = "642 -- 648",
journal = "Diseases of the Esophagus",
issn = "1120-8694",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
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}

Medium-term outcome of fundoplication after lung transplantation. / Burton, Paul Robert; Button, Brenda; Brown, Wendy Ann; Lee, Min-Jae; Roberts, Stuart; Hassen, Sayed; Bailey, Michael John; Smith, Andrew Ian; Snell, Gregory I.

In: Diseases of the Esophagus, Vol. 22, No. 8, 2009, p. 642 - 648.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Medium-term outcome of fundoplication after lung transplantation.

AU - Burton, Paul Robert

AU - Button, Brenda

AU - Brown, Wendy Ann

AU - Lee, Min-Jae

AU - Roberts, Stuart

AU - Hassen, Sayed

AU - Bailey, Michael John

AU - Smith, Andrew Ian

AU - Snell, Gregory I

PY - 2009

Y1 - 2009

N2 - Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in lung transplant recipients has gained increasing attention as a factor in allograft failure. There are few data on the impact of fundoplication on survival or lung function, and less on its effect on symptoms or quality of life. Patients undergoing fundoplication following lung transplantation from 1999 to 2005 were included in the study. Patient satisfaction, changes in GERD symptoms, and the presence of known side effects were assessed. The effect on lung function, body mass index, and rate of progression to the bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS) were recorded. Twenty-one patients (13 males), in whom reflux was confirmed on objective criteria, were included, with a mean age of 43 years (range 20a??68). Time between transplantation and fundoplication was 768 days (range 145a??1524). The indication for fundoplication was suspected microaspiration in 13 and symptoms of GERD in 8. There was one perioperative death, at day 17. There were three other late deaths. Fundoplication did not appear to affect progression to BOS stage 1, although it may have slowed progression to stage 2 and 3. Forced expiratory volume-1 predicted was 72.9 (20.9), 6 months prior to fundoplication and 70.4 (26.8), six months post-fundoplication, P= 0.33. Body mass index decreased significantly in the 6 months following fundoplication (23 kg/m2 vs. 21 kg/m2, P= 0.05). Patients were satisfied with the outcome of the fundoplication (mean satisfaction score 8.8 out of 10). Prevalence of GERD symptoms decreased significantly following surgery (11 of 14 vs. 4 of 17, P= 0.002).

AB - Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in lung transplant recipients has gained increasing attention as a factor in allograft failure. There are few data on the impact of fundoplication on survival or lung function, and less on its effect on symptoms or quality of life. Patients undergoing fundoplication following lung transplantation from 1999 to 2005 were included in the study. Patient satisfaction, changes in GERD symptoms, and the presence of known side effects were assessed. The effect on lung function, body mass index, and rate of progression to the bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS) were recorded. Twenty-one patients (13 males), in whom reflux was confirmed on objective criteria, were included, with a mean age of 43 years (range 20a??68). Time between transplantation and fundoplication was 768 days (range 145a??1524). The indication for fundoplication was suspected microaspiration in 13 and symptoms of GERD in 8. There was one perioperative death, at day 17. There were three other late deaths. Fundoplication did not appear to affect progression to BOS stage 1, although it may have slowed progression to stage 2 and 3. Forced expiratory volume-1 predicted was 72.9 (20.9), 6 months prior to fundoplication and 70.4 (26.8), six months post-fundoplication, P= 0.33. Body mass index decreased significantly in the 6 months following fundoplication (23 kg/m2 vs. 21 kg/m2, P= 0.05). Patients were satisfied with the outcome of the fundoplication (mean satisfaction score 8.8 out of 10). Prevalence of GERD symptoms decreased significantly following surgery (11 of 14 vs. 4 of 17, P= 0.002).

UR - http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/fulltext/122454049/HTMLSTART

U2 - 10.1111/j.1442-2050.2009.00980.x

DO - 10.1111/j.1442-2050.2009.00980.x

M3 - Article

VL - 22

SP - 642

EP - 648

JO - Diseases of the Esophagus

JF - Diseases of the Esophagus

SN - 1120-8694

IS - 8

ER -