Medical graduates' knowledge of bloodborne viruses and occupational exposures

Nicole Koehler, Olga Vera Vujovic, Claire Dendle, Christine Catherine McMenamin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A survey of medical graduates commencing employment as junior doctors was performed to investigate knowledge of bloodborne viruses and occupational exposure management, coupled with their experience of occupational exposures. There was a mismatch between general knowledge (excellent) and knowledge of postexposure management (poor), and graduates had commonly experienced an occupational exposure and not reported it. The knowledge deficit regarding postexposure management and history of poor practice (ie, nonreporting) following an exposure implies that the transition period from student to junior doctor may be associated with increased occupational health and safety risk.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)203 - 205
Number of pages3
JournalAmerican Journal of Infection Control
Volume42
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

Cite this

@article{7295ce6120e14053a8ab3580a73f66c0,
title = "Medical graduates' knowledge of bloodborne viruses and occupational exposures",
abstract = "A survey of medical graduates commencing employment as junior doctors was performed to investigate knowledge of bloodborne viruses and occupational exposure management, coupled with their experience of occupational exposures. There was a mismatch between general knowledge (excellent) and knowledge of postexposure management (poor), and graduates had commonly experienced an occupational exposure and not reported it. The knowledge deficit regarding postexposure management and history of poor practice (ie, nonreporting) following an exposure implies that the transition period from student to junior doctor may be associated with increased occupational health and safety risk.",
author = "Nicole Koehler and Vujovic, {Olga Vera} and Claire Dendle and McMenamin, {Christine Catherine}",
year = "2014",
doi = "10.1016/j.ajic.2013.08.005",
language = "English",
volume = "42",
pages = "203 -- 205",
journal = "American Journal of Infection Control",
issn = "0196-6553",
publisher = "Elsevier",
number = "2",

}

Medical graduates' knowledge of bloodborne viruses and occupational exposures. / Koehler, Nicole; Vujovic, Olga Vera; Dendle, Claire; McMenamin, Christine Catherine.

In: American Journal of Infection Control, Vol. 42, No. 2, 2014, p. 203 - 205.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Medical graduates' knowledge of bloodborne viruses and occupational exposures

AU - Koehler, Nicole

AU - Vujovic, Olga Vera

AU - Dendle, Claire

AU - McMenamin, Christine Catherine

PY - 2014

Y1 - 2014

N2 - A survey of medical graduates commencing employment as junior doctors was performed to investigate knowledge of bloodborne viruses and occupational exposure management, coupled with their experience of occupational exposures. There was a mismatch between general knowledge (excellent) and knowledge of postexposure management (poor), and graduates had commonly experienced an occupational exposure and not reported it. The knowledge deficit regarding postexposure management and history of poor practice (ie, nonreporting) following an exposure implies that the transition period from student to junior doctor may be associated with increased occupational health and safety risk.

AB - A survey of medical graduates commencing employment as junior doctors was performed to investigate knowledge of bloodborne viruses and occupational exposure management, coupled with their experience of occupational exposures. There was a mismatch between general knowledge (excellent) and knowledge of postexposure management (poor), and graduates had commonly experienced an occupational exposure and not reported it. The knowledge deficit regarding postexposure management and history of poor practice (ie, nonreporting) following an exposure implies that the transition period from student to junior doctor may be associated with increased occupational health and safety risk.

UR - http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0196655313011978

U2 - 10.1016/j.ajic.2013.08.005

DO - 10.1016/j.ajic.2013.08.005

M3 - Article

VL - 42

SP - 203

EP - 205

JO - American Journal of Infection Control

JF - American Journal of Infection Control

SN - 0196-6553

IS - 2

ER -