Maternal vitamin D supplementation during pregnancy prevents vitamin D deficiency in the newborn: an open-label randomized controlled trial

Christine P Rodda, Jodie Elise Benson, Amanda Jane Vincent, Clare Louise Whitehead, Alex Polyakov, Beverley Janine Vollenhoven

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To determine whether maternal vitamin D supplementation, in the vitamin D deficient mother, prevents neonatal vitamin D deficiency. DESIGN: Open-label randomized controlled trial. SETTING: Metropolitan Melbourne, Australia, tertiary hospital routine antenatal outpatient clinic. PARTICIPANTS:Seventy-eight women with singleton pregnancies with vitamin D deficiency/insufficiency (serum 25-OH Vit D <75 nmol/l) at their first antenatal appointment at 12-16-week gestation were recruited. INTERVENTION:Participants were randomized to vitamin D supplementation (2000-4000 IU cholecalciferol) orally daily until delivery or no supplementation. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:The primary outcome was neonatal serum 25-OH vit D concentration at delivery. The secondary outcome was maternal serum 25-OH vit D concentration at delivery. RESULTS:Baseline mean maternal serum 25-OH vit D concentrations were similar (P = 0?9) between treatment (32 nmol/l, 95 confidence interval 26-39 nmol/l) and control groups (33 nmol/l, 95 CI 26-39 nmol/l). Umbilical cord serum 25-OH vit D concentrations at delivery were higher (P <0?0001) in neonates of treatment group mothers (81 nmol/l, 95 CI; 70-91 nmol/l) compared with neonates of control group mothers (42 nmol/l, 95 CI; 34-50 nmol/l) with a strongly positive correlation between maternal serum 25-OH Vit D and umbilical cord serum 25-OH vit D concentrations at delivery (Spearman rank correlation coefficient 0?88; P <0?0001). Mean maternal serum 25-OH Vit D concentrations at delivery were higher (P <0?0001) in the treatment group (71 nmol/l, 95 CI; 62-81 nmol/l) compared with the control group (36 nmol/l, 95 CI; 29-42 nmol/l). CONCLUSION:Vitamin D supplementation of vitamin D deficient pregnant women prevents neonatal vitamin D deficiency.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)363 - 368
Number of pages6
JournalClinical Endocrinology
Volume83
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

Cite this

@article{2d38080302bd4171b090ae019d707669,
title = "Maternal vitamin D supplementation during pregnancy prevents vitamin D deficiency in the newborn: an open-label randomized controlled trial",
abstract = "OBJECTIVE: To determine whether maternal vitamin D supplementation, in the vitamin D deficient mother, prevents neonatal vitamin D deficiency. DESIGN: Open-label randomized controlled trial. SETTING: Metropolitan Melbourne, Australia, tertiary hospital routine antenatal outpatient clinic. PARTICIPANTS:Seventy-eight women with singleton pregnancies with vitamin D deficiency/insufficiency (serum 25-OH Vit D <75 nmol/l) at their first antenatal appointment at 12-16-week gestation were recruited. INTERVENTION:Participants were randomized to vitamin D supplementation (2000-4000 IU cholecalciferol) orally daily until delivery or no supplementation. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:The primary outcome was neonatal serum 25-OH vit D concentration at delivery. The secondary outcome was maternal serum 25-OH vit D concentration at delivery. RESULTS:Baseline mean maternal serum 25-OH vit D concentrations were similar (P = 0?9) between treatment (32 nmol/l, 95 confidence interval 26-39 nmol/l) and control groups (33 nmol/l, 95 CI 26-39 nmol/l). Umbilical cord serum 25-OH vit D concentrations at delivery were higher (P <0?0001) in neonates of treatment group mothers (81 nmol/l, 95 CI; 70-91 nmol/l) compared with neonates of control group mothers (42 nmol/l, 95 CI; 34-50 nmol/l) with a strongly positive correlation between maternal serum 25-OH Vit D and umbilical cord serum 25-OH vit D concentrations at delivery (Spearman rank correlation coefficient 0?88; P <0?0001). Mean maternal serum 25-OH Vit D concentrations at delivery were higher (P <0?0001) in the treatment group (71 nmol/l, 95 CI; 62-81 nmol/l) compared with the control group (36 nmol/l, 95 CI; 29-42 nmol/l). CONCLUSION:Vitamin D supplementation of vitamin D deficient pregnant women prevents neonatal vitamin D deficiency.",
author = "Rodda, {Christine P} and Benson, {Jodie Elise} and Vincent, {Amanda Jane} and Whitehead, {Clare Louise} and Alex Polyakov and Vollenhoven, {Beverley Janine}",
year = "2015",
doi = "10.1111/cen.12762",
language = "English",
volume = "83",
pages = "363 -- 368",
journal = "Clinical Endocrinology",
issn = "0300-0664",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
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Maternal vitamin D supplementation during pregnancy prevents vitamin D deficiency in the newborn: an open-label randomized controlled trial. / Rodda, Christine P; Benson, Jodie Elise; Vincent, Amanda Jane; Whitehead, Clare Louise; Polyakov, Alex; Vollenhoven, Beverley Janine.

In: Clinical Endocrinology, Vol. 83, No. 3, 2015, p. 363 - 368.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Maternal vitamin D supplementation during pregnancy prevents vitamin D deficiency in the newborn: an open-label randomized controlled trial

AU - Rodda, Christine P

AU - Benson, Jodie Elise

AU - Vincent, Amanda Jane

AU - Whitehead, Clare Louise

AU - Polyakov, Alex

AU - Vollenhoven, Beverley Janine

PY - 2015

Y1 - 2015

N2 - OBJECTIVE: To determine whether maternal vitamin D supplementation, in the vitamin D deficient mother, prevents neonatal vitamin D deficiency. DESIGN: Open-label randomized controlled trial. SETTING: Metropolitan Melbourne, Australia, tertiary hospital routine antenatal outpatient clinic. PARTICIPANTS:Seventy-eight women with singleton pregnancies with vitamin D deficiency/insufficiency (serum 25-OH Vit D <75 nmol/l) at their first antenatal appointment at 12-16-week gestation were recruited. INTERVENTION:Participants were randomized to vitamin D supplementation (2000-4000 IU cholecalciferol) orally daily until delivery or no supplementation. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:The primary outcome was neonatal serum 25-OH vit D concentration at delivery. The secondary outcome was maternal serum 25-OH vit D concentration at delivery. RESULTS:Baseline mean maternal serum 25-OH vit D concentrations were similar (P = 0?9) between treatment (32 nmol/l, 95 confidence interval 26-39 nmol/l) and control groups (33 nmol/l, 95 CI 26-39 nmol/l). Umbilical cord serum 25-OH vit D concentrations at delivery were higher (P <0?0001) in neonates of treatment group mothers (81 nmol/l, 95 CI; 70-91 nmol/l) compared with neonates of control group mothers (42 nmol/l, 95 CI; 34-50 nmol/l) with a strongly positive correlation between maternal serum 25-OH Vit D and umbilical cord serum 25-OH vit D concentrations at delivery (Spearman rank correlation coefficient 0?88; P <0?0001). Mean maternal serum 25-OH Vit D concentrations at delivery were higher (P <0?0001) in the treatment group (71 nmol/l, 95 CI; 62-81 nmol/l) compared with the control group (36 nmol/l, 95 CI; 29-42 nmol/l). CONCLUSION:Vitamin D supplementation of vitamin D deficient pregnant women prevents neonatal vitamin D deficiency.

AB - OBJECTIVE: To determine whether maternal vitamin D supplementation, in the vitamin D deficient mother, prevents neonatal vitamin D deficiency. DESIGN: Open-label randomized controlled trial. SETTING: Metropolitan Melbourne, Australia, tertiary hospital routine antenatal outpatient clinic. PARTICIPANTS:Seventy-eight women with singleton pregnancies with vitamin D deficiency/insufficiency (serum 25-OH Vit D <75 nmol/l) at their first antenatal appointment at 12-16-week gestation were recruited. INTERVENTION:Participants were randomized to vitamin D supplementation (2000-4000 IU cholecalciferol) orally daily until delivery or no supplementation. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:The primary outcome was neonatal serum 25-OH vit D concentration at delivery. The secondary outcome was maternal serum 25-OH vit D concentration at delivery. RESULTS:Baseline mean maternal serum 25-OH vit D concentrations were similar (P = 0?9) between treatment (32 nmol/l, 95 confidence interval 26-39 nmol/l) and control groups (33 nmol/l, 95 CI 26-39 nmol/l). Umbilical cord serum 25-OH vit D concentrations at delivery were higher (P <0?0001) in neonates of treatment group mothers (81 nmol/l, 95 CI; 70-91 nmol/l) compared with neonates of control group mothers (42 nmol/l, 95 CI; 34-50 nmol/l) with a strongly positive correlation between maternal serum 25-OH Vit D and umbilical cord serum 25-OH vit D concentrations at delivery (Spearman rank correlation coefficient 0?88; P <0?0001). Mean maternal serum 25-OH Vit D concentrations at delivery were higher (P <0?0001) in the treatment group (71 nmol/l, 95 CI; 62-81 nmol/l) compared with the control group (36 nmol/l, 95 CI; 29-42 nmol/l). CONCLUSION:Vitamin D supplementation of vitamin D deficient pregnant women prevents neonatal vitamin D deficiency.

UR - http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/cen.12762/pdf

U2 - 10.1111/cen.12762

DO - 10.1111/cen.12762

M3 - Article

VL - 83

SP - 363

EP - 368

JO - Clinical Endocrinology

JF - Clinical Endocrinology

SN - 0300-0664

IS - 3

ER -