Marketing-driven philanthropy: The case of PlayPumps

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleOther

Abstract

Purpose -The purpose of this paper is to investigate, through a comparative historical analysis, the impact of a shift to a marketing-driven (business-oriented) philanthropic funding structure on NGOs, international businesses that fund charities, and the recipients of the funding for a water pump system in southern Africa. Design/methodology/approach -The study deconstructs and dissects the introduction and acceptance of the PlayPumps water pump system by generating four historical funding-structure models that typified the philanthropic funding at the time. Each time period is critically examined to investigate how changes toward marketing-driven philanthropy affected the viability of the project. Findings -The key finding is that by shifting to a marketing-driven (business-oriented) philanthropic funding structure, NGOs risk fundamentally disconnecting the funders and the recipients of the funding. Serious concerns arise regarding the role of businesses in driving the overcommercialisation of marketing-driven philanthropy. Research limitations/implications -The funding-structure models highlight some of the hidden costs of marketing-driven philanthropic funding, but do not show what funding structure would be most efficient in better connecting international businesses and consumers with the charities they are supporting. Originality/value -This analysis examines the underexplored intersection of business, marketing, consumerism and philanthropy.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)321 - 335
Number of pages15
JournalEuropean Business Review
Volume25
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013

Cite this

@article{88400056c4544010bc4b3aba5a6780f3,
title = "Marketing-driven philanthropy: The case of PlayPumps",
abstract = "Purpose -The purpose of this paper is to investigate, through a comparative historical analysis, the impact of a shift to a marketing-driven (business-oriented) philanthropic funding structure on NGOs, international businesses that fund charities, and the recipients of the funding for a water pump system in southern Africa. Design/methodology/approach -The study deconstructs and dissects the introduction and acceptance of the PlayPumps water pump system by generating four historical funding-structure models that typified the philanthropic funding at the time. Each time period is critically examined to investigate how changes toward marketing-driven philanthropy affected the viability of the project. Findings -The key finding is that by shifting to a marketing-driven (business-oriented) philanthropic funding structure, NGOs risk fundamentally disconnecting the funders and the recipients of the funding. Serious concerns arise regarding the role of businesses in driving the overcommercialisation of marketing-driven philanthropy. Research limitations/implications -The funding-structure models highlight some of the hidden costs of marketing-driven philanthropic funding, but do not show what funding structure would be most efficient in better connecting international businesses and consumers with the charities they are supporting. Originality/value -This analysis examines the underexplored intersection of business, marketing, consumerism and philanthropy.",
author = "Saunders, {Stephen Graham} and Ralph Borland",
year = "2013",
doi = "10.1108/EBR-02-2013-0011",
language = "English",
volume = "25",
pages = "321 -- 335",
journal = "European Business Review",
issn = "0955-534X",
publisher = "Emerald",
number = "4",

}

Marketing-driven philanthropy: The case of PlayPumps. / Saunders, Stephen Graham; Borland, Ralph.

In: European Business Review, Vol. 25, No. 4, 2013, p. 321 - 335.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleOther

TY - JOUR

T1 - Marketing-driven philanthropy: The case of PlayPumps

AU - Saunders, Stephen Graham

AU - Borland, Ralph

PY - 2013

Y1 - 2013

N2 - Purpose -The purpose of this paper is to investigate, through a comparative historical analysis, the impact of a shift to a marketing-driven (business-oriented) philanthropic funding structure on NGOs, international businesses that fund charities, and the recipients of the funding for a water pump system in southern Africa. Design/methodology/approach -The study deconstructs and dissects the introduction and acceptance of the PlayPumps water pump system by generating four historical funding-structure models that typified the philanthropic funding at the time. Each time period is critically examined to investigate how changes toward marketing-driven philanthropy affected the viability of the project. Findings -The key finding is that by shifting to a marketing-driven (business-oriented) philanthropic funding structure, NGOs risk fundamentally disconnecting the funders and the recipients of the funding. Serious concerns arise regarding the role of businesses in driving the overcommercialisation of marketing-driven philanthropy. Research limitations/implications -The funding-structure models highlight some of the hidden costs of marketing-driven philanthropic funding, but do not show what funding structure would be most efficient in better connecting international businesses and consumers with the charities they are supporting. Originality/value -This analysis examines the underexplored intersection of business, marketing, consumerism and philanthropy.

AB - Purpose -The purpose of this paper is to investigate, through a comparative historical analysis, the impact of a shift to a marketing-driven (business-oriented) philanthropic funding structure on NGOs, international businesses that fund charities, and the recipients of the funding for a water pump system in southern Africa. Design/methodology/approach -The study deconstructs and dissects the introduction and acceptance of the PlayPumps water pump system by generating four historical funding-structure models that typified the philanthropic funding at the time. Each time period is critically examined to investigate how changes toward marketing-driven philanthropy affected the viability of the project. Findings -The key finding is that by shifting to a marketing-driven (business-oriented) philanthropic funding structure, NGOs risk fundamentally disconnecting the funders and the recipients of the funding. Serious concerns arise regarding the role of businesses in driving the overcommercialisation of marketing-driven philanthropy. Research limitations/implications -The funding-structure models highlight some of the hidden costs of marketing-driven philanthropic funding, but do not show what funding structure would be most efficient in better connecting international businesses and consumers with the charities they are supporting. Originality/value -This analysis examines the underexplored intersection of business, marketing, consumerism and philanthropy.

U2 - 10.1108/EBR-02-2013-0011

DO - 10.1108/EBR-02-2013-0011

M3 - Article

VL - 25

SP - 321

EP - 335

JO - European Business Review

JF - European Business Review

SN - 0955-534X

IS - 4

ER -