Malaysian primary pre-service teachers' perceptions of students' disruptive behaviour

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The purpose of this paper was to investigate Malaysian primary pre-service teachers? perceptions of students? disruptive behaviour and their self-reported strategies to prevent and to manage such behaviours. Results indicate that Malaysian pre-service teachers understand disruptive behaviours to be those that disrupt the learning and teaching process. They identified the cause of student disruptive behaviour as factors residing within the individual student. Pre-service teachers here reported preventative strategies in terms of changing teaching strategies and threats to use punishment. When addressing students? disruptive behaviour, pre-service teachers reported that they would use one-to-one counselling with students and remove tokens or hold back rewards. A discussion regarding the implications for teacher education institutions and future research concludes this paper.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)371 - 380
Number of pages10
JournalAsia Pacific Education Review
Volume14
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013

Cite this

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abstract = "The purpose of this paper was to investigate Malaysian primary pre-service teachers? perceptions of students? disruptive behaviour and their self-reported strategies to prevent and to manage such behaviours. Results indicate that Malaysian pre-service teachers understand disruptive behaviours to be those that disrupt the learning and teaching process. They identified the cause of student disruptive behaviour as factors residing within the individual student. Pre-service teachers here reported preventative strategies in terms of changing teaching strategies and threats to use punishment. When addressing students? disruptive behaviour, pre-service teachers reported that they would use one-to-one counselling with students and remove tokens or hold back rewards. A discussion regarding the implications for teacher education institutions and future research concludes this paper.",
author = "Norzila Zakaria and Reupert, {Andrea Erika} and Umesh Sharma",
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volume = "14",
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Malaysian primary pre-service teachers' perceptions of students' disruptive behaviour. / Zakaria, Norzila; Reupert, Andrea Erika; Sharma, Umesh.

In: Asia Pacific Education Review, Vol. 14, No. 3, 2013, p. 371 - 380.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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AB - The purpose of this paper was to investigate Malaysian primary pre-service teachers? perceptions of students? disruptive behaviour and their self-reported strategies to prevent and to manage such behaviours. Results indicate that Malaysian pre-service teachers understand disruptive behaviours to be those that disrupt the learning and teaching process. They identified the cause of student disruptive behaviour as factors residing within the individual student. Pre-service teachers here reported preventative strategies in terms of changing teaching strategies and threats to use punishment. When addressing students? disruptive behaviour, pre-service teachers reported that they would use one-to-one counselling with students and remove tokens or hold back rewards. A discussion regarding the implications for teacher education institutions and future research concludes this paper.

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