Macrophages and diabetic nephropathy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

65 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Evidence from renal biopsies has shown that macrophage accumulation in diabetic kidneys predicts declining renal function, suggesting a pathogenic role for these cells in diabetic nephropathy. Further evidence from animal models has shown that macrophages are the major immune cells infiltrating the kidney in type 1 and type 2 diabetes, and that they contribute to the development of renal injury and sclerosis. This review examines macrophages in human and experimental diabetic nephropathy, exploring the mechanisms of macrophage recruitment and activation, and the process of macrophage-mediated injury in diabetic kidneys. The ability of current therapies and novel anti-inflammatory treatments to reduce macrophage-mediated injury in diabetic kidneys also is considered, which has important implications for the future management of patients with diabetic nephropathy.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)290 - 301
Number of pages12
JournalSeminars in Nephrology
Volume30
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010

Cite this

Tesch, Gregory. / Macrophages and diabetic nephropathy. In: Seminars in Nephrology. 2010 ; Vol. 30, No. 3. pp. 290 - 301.
@article{e607019480e74c0d9a61dc4d619819ad,
title = "Macrophages and diabetic nephropathy",
abstract = "Evidence from renal biopsies has shown that macrophage accumulation in diabetic kidneys predicts declining renal function, suggesting a pathogenic role for these cells in diabetic nephropathy. Further evidence from animal models has shown that macrophages are the major immune cells infiltrating the kidney in type 1 and type 2 diabetes, and that they contribute to the development of renal injury and sclerosis. This review examines macrophages in human and experimental diabetic nephropathy, exploring the mechanisms of macrophage recruitment and activation, and the process of macrophage-mediated injury in diabetic kidneys. The ability of current therapies and novel anti-inflammatory treatments to reduce macrophage-mediated injury in diabetic kidneys also is considered, which has important implications for the future management of patients with diabetic nephropathy.",
author = "Gregory Tesch",
year = "2010",
doi = "10.1016/j.semnephrol.2010.03.007",
language = "English",
volume = "30",
pages = "290 -- 301",
journal = "Seminars in Nephrology",
issn = "0270-9295",
publisher = "Elsevier",
number = "3",

}

Macrophages and diabetic nephropathy. / Tesch, Gregory.

In: Seminars in Nephrology, Vol. 30, No. 3, 2010, p. 290 - 301.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Macrophages and diabetic nephropathy

AU - Tesch, Gregory

PY - 2010

Y1 - 2010

N2 - Evidence from renal biopsies has shown that macrophage accumulation in diabetic kidneys predicts declining renal function, suggesting a pathogenic role for these cells in diabetic nephropathy. Further evidence from animal models has shown that macrophages are the major immune cells infiltrating the kidney in type 1 and type 2 diabetes, and that they contribute to the development of renal injury and sclerosis. This review examines macrophages in human and experimental diabetic nephropathy, exploring the mechanisms of macrophage recruitment and activation, and the process of macrophage-mediated injury in diabetic kidneys. The ability of current therapies and novel anti-inflammatory treatments to reduce macrophage-mediated injury in diabetic kidneys also is considered, which has important implications for the future management of patients with diabetic nephropathy.

AB - Evidence from renal biopsies has shown that macrophage accumulation in diabetic kidneys predicts declining renal function, suggesting a pathogenic role for these cells in diabetic nephropathy. Further evidence from animal models has shown that macrophages are the major immune cells infiltrating the kidney in type 1 and type 2 diabetes, and that they contribute to the development of renal injury and sclerosis. This review examines macrophages in human and experimental diabetic nephropathy, exploring the mechanisms of macrophage recruitment and activation, and the process of macrophage-mediated injury in diabetic kidneys. The ability of current therapies and novel anti-inflammatory treatments to reduce macrophage-mediated injury in diabetic kidneys also is considered, which has important implications for the future management of patients with diabetic nephropathy.

U2 - 10.1016/j.semnephrol.2010.03.007

DO - 10.1016/j.semnephrol.2010.03.007

M3 - Article

VL - 30

SP - 290

EP - 301

JO - Seminars in Nephrology

JF - Seminars in Nephrology

SN - 0270-9295

IS - 3

ER -