LRP1B deletion in high-grade serous ovarian cancers is associated with acquired chemotherapy resistance to liposomal doxorubicin

Prue A. Cowin, Joshy George, Sian Fereday, Elizabeth Loehrer, Peter Van Loo, Carleen M Cullinane, Dariush Etemadmoghadam, Sarah Ftouni, Laura Galletta, Michael Stephen Anglesio, Joy Hendley, Leanne Bowes, Karen E Sheppard, Elizabeth L. Christie, Richard B. Pearson, Paul R. Harnett, Viola Heinzelmann-Schwarz, Michael Friedlander, Orla M McNally, Michael QuinnPeter Campbell, Anna DeFazio, David D L Bowtell

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62 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

High-grade serous cancer (HGSC), the most common subtype of ovarian cancer, often becomes resistant to chemotherapy, leading to poor patient outcomes. Intratumoral heterogeneity occurs in nearly all solid cancers, including ovarian cancer, contributing to the development of resistance mechanisms. In this study, we examined the spatial and temporal genomic variation in HGSC using high-resolution single-nucleotide polymorphism arrays. Multiple metastatic lesions from individual patients were analyzed along with 22 paired pretreatment and posttreatment samples. We documented regions of differential DNA copy number between multiple tumor biopsies that correlated with altered expression of genes involved in cell polarity and adhesion. In the paired primary and relapse cohort, we observed a greater degree of genomic change in tumors from patients that were initially sensitive to chemotherapy and had longer progression-free interval compared with tumors from patients that were resistant to primary chemotherapy. Notably, deletion or downregulation of the lipid transporter LRP1B emerged as a significant correlate of acquired resistance in our analysis. Functional studies showed that reducing LRP1B expression was sufficient to reduce the sensitivity of HGSC cell lines to liposomal doxorubicin, but not to doxorubicin, whereas LRP1B overexpression was sufficient to increase sensitivity to liposomal doxorubicin. Together, our findings underscore the large degree of variation in DNA copy number in spatially and temporally separated tumors in HGSC patients, and they define LRP1B as a potential contributor to the emergence of chemotherapy resistance in these patients.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)4060-4073
Number of pages14
JournalCancer Research
Volume72
Issue number16
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 15 Aug 2012
Externally publishedYes

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