Longitudinal growth of the basal ganglia and thalamus in very preterm children

Wai Yen Loh, Peter J. Anderson, Jeanie L.Y. Cheong, Alicia J. Spittle, Jian Chen, Katherine J. Lee, Charlotte Molesworth, Terrie E. Inder, Alan Connelly, Lex W. Doyle, Deanne K. Thompson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

The impact of very preterm (VP) birth on the development of individual basal ganglia nuclei and the thalamus during childhood remains unclear. We first aimed to compare (1a) the volumes of individual basal ganglia nuclei (nucleus accumbens, caudate nucleus, pallidum, putamen) and the thalamus at age 7 years, and (1b) their volumetric change from infancy to 7 years, in VP children with term-born children. Secondly, we aimed to (2a) determine whether basal ganglia and thalamic volumes at 7 years, or (2b) basal ganglia and thalamic growth rates from infancy to 7 years were associated with neurodevelopmental outcomes at 7 years, and whether these associations differed between the VP and term-born children. One hundred and fifty-four VP (<30 weeks’ gestational age or birth weight < 1250 g) and 35 term-born children had useable magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans that could be analyzed at 7 years. Of these, 149 VP and 30 term-born infants also had useable MRI scans at term-equivalent age. Volumes of the individual basal ganglia nuclei and the thalamus were automatically generated from the MRI scans. Compared with the term-born group, the VP group had smaller basal ganglia and thalamic volumes at 7 years and slower growth rates from birth to 7 years. After controlling for overall brain size, VP children still had smaller thalamic volumes but the deep grey matter volume growth rates from birth to 7 years were similar between groups. Reduced basal ganglia and thalamic volumes and slower growth rates in the VP group were associated with poorer cognition, academic achievement and motor function at 7 years. After controlling for overall brain size, the nucleus accumbens and pallidum were the deep grey matter structures most strongly associated with 7-year neurodevelopmental outcomes. In conclusion, basal ganglia and thalamic growth is delayed during early childhood in VP children, with delayed development contributing to poorer functional outcomes.

Original languageEnglish
Number of pages14
JournalBrain Imaging and Behavior
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 14 Mar 2019

Keywords

  • Basal ganglia
  • Neurodevelopment
  • Thalamus
  • Very preterm

Cite this

Loh, W. Y., Anderson, P. J., Cheong, J. L. Y., Spittle, A. J., Chen, J., Lee, K. J., ... Thompson, D. K. (Accepted/In press). Longitudinal growth of the basal ganglia and thalamus in very preterm children. Brain Imaging and Behavior. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11682-019-00057-z
Loh, Wai Yen ; Anderson, Peter J. ; Cheong, Jeanie L.Y. ; Spittle, Alicia J. ; Chen, Jian ; Lee, Katherine J. ; Molesworth, Charlotte ; Inder, Terrie E. ; Connelly, Alan ; Doyle, Lex W. ; Thompson, Deanne K. / Longitudinal growth of the basal ganglia and thalamus in very preterm children. In: Brain Imaging and Behavior. 2019.
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abstract = "The impact of very preterm (VP) birth on the development of individual basal ganglia nuclei and the thalamus during childhood remains unclear. We first aimed to compare (1a) the volumes of individual basal ganglia nuclei (nucleus accumbens, caudate nucleus, pallidum, putamen) and the thalamus at age 7 years, and (1b) their volumetric change from infancy to 7 years, in VP children with term-born children. Secondly, we aimed to (2a) determine whether basal ganglia and thalamic volumes at 7 years, or (2b) basal ganglia and thalamic growth rates from infancy to 7 years were associated with neurodevelopmental outcomes at 7 years, and whether these associations differed between the VP and term-born children. One hundred and fifty-four VP (<30 weeks’ gestational age or birth weight < 1250 g) and 35 term-born children had useable magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans that could be analyzed at 7 years. Of these, 149 VP and 30 term-born infants also had useable MRI scans at term-equivalent age. Volumes of the individual basal ganglia nuclei and the thalamus were automatically generated from the MRI scans. Compared with the term-born group, the VP group had smaller basal ganglia and thalamic volumes at 7 years and slower growth rates from birth to 7 years. After controlling for overall brain size, VP children still had smaller thalamic volumes but the deep grey matter volume growth rates from birth to 7 years were similar between groups. Reduced basal ganglia and thalamic volumes and slower growth rates in the VP group were associated with poorer cognition, academic achievement and motor function at 7 years. After controlling for overall brain size, the nucleus accumbens and pallidum were the deep grey matter structures most strongly associated with 7-year neurodevelopmental outcomes. In conclusion, basal ganglia and thalamic growth is delayed during early childhood in VP children, with delayed development contributing to poorer functional outcomes.",
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Loh, WY, Anderson, PJ, Cheong, JLY, Spittle, AJ, Chen, J, Lee, KJ, Molesworth, C, Inder, TE, Connelly, A, Doyle, LW & Thompson, DK 2019, 'Longitudinal growth of the basal ganglia and thalamus in very preterm children', Brain Imaging and Behavior. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11682-019-00057-z

Longitudinal growth of the basal ganglia and thalamus in very preterm children. / Loh, Wai Yen; Anderson, Peter J.; Cheong, Jeanie L.Y.; Spittle, Alicia J.; Chen, Jian; Lee, Katherine J.; Molesworth, Charlotte; Inder, Terrie E.; Connelly, Alan; Doyle, Lex W.; Thompson, Deanne K.

In: Brain Imaging and Behavior, 14.03.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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T1 - Longitudinal growth of the basal ganglia and thalamus in very preterm children

AU - Loh, Wai Yen

AU - Anderson, Peter J.

AU - Cheong, Jeanie L.Y.

AU - Spittle, Alicia J.

AU - Chen, Jian

AU - Lee, Katherine J.

AU - Molesworth, Charlotte

AU - Inder, Terrie E.

AU - Connelly, Alan

AU - Doyle, Lex W.

AU - Thompson, Deanne K.

PY - 2019/3/14

Y1 - 2019/3/14

N2 - The impact of very preterm (VP) birth on the development of individual basal ganglia nuclei and the thalamus during childhood remains unclear. We first aimed to compare (1a) the volumes of individual basal ganglia nuclei (nucleus accumbens, caudate nucleus, pallidum, putamen) and the thalamus at age 7 years, and (1b) their volumetric change from infancy to 7 years, in VP children with term-born children. Secondly, we aimed to (2a) determine whether basal ganglia and thalamic volumes at 7 years, or (2b) basal ganglia and thalamic growth rates from infancy to 7 years were associated with neurodevelopmental outcomes at 7 years, and whether these associations differed between the VP and term-born children. One hundred and fifty-four VP (<30 weeks’ gestational age or birth weight < 1250 g) and 35 term-born children had useable magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans that could be analyzed at 7 years. Of these, 149 VP and 30 term-born infants also had useable MRI scans at term-equivalent age. Volumes of the individual basal ganglia nuclei and the thalamus were automatically generated from the MRI scans. Compared with the term-born group, the VP group had smaller basal ganglia and thalamic volumes at 7 years and slower growth rates from birth to 7 years. After controlling for overall brain size, VP children still had smaller thalamic volumes but the deep grey matter volume growth rates from birth to 7 years were similar between groups. Reduced basal ganglia and thalamic volumes and slower growth rates in the VP group were associated with poorer cognition, academic achievement and motor function at 7 years. After controlling for overall brain size, the nucleus accumbens and pallidum were the deep grey matter structures most strongly associated with 7-year neurodevelopmental outcomes. In conclusion, basal ganglia and thalamic growth is delayed during early childhood in VP children, with delayed development contributing to poorer functional outcomes.

AB - The impact of very preterm (VP) birth on the development of individual basal ganglia nuclei and the thalamus during childhood remains unclear. We first aimed to compare (1a) the volumes of individual basal ganglia nuclei (nucleus accumbens, caudate nucleus, pallidum, putamen) and the thalamus at age 7 years, and (1b) their volumetric change from infancy to 7 years, in VP children with term-born children. Secondly, we aimed to (2a) determine whether basal ganglia and thalamic volumes at 7 years, or (2b) basal ganglia and thalamic growth rates from infancy to 7 years were associated with neurodevelopmental outcomes at 7 years, and whether these associations differed between the VP and term-born children. One hundred and fifty-four VP (<30 weeks’ gestational age or birth weight < 1250 g) and 35 term-born children had useable magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans that could be analyzed at 7 years. Of these, 149 VP and 30 term-born infants also had useable MRI scans at term-equivalent age. Volumes of the individual basal ganglia nuclei and the thalamus were automatically generated from the MRI scans. Compared with the term-born group, the VP group had smaller basal ganglia and thalamic volumes at 7 years and slower growth rates from birth to 7 years. After controlling for overall brain size, VP children still had smaller thalamic volumes but the deep grey matter volume growth rates from birth to 7 years were similar between groups. Reduced basal ganglia and thalamic volumes and slower growth rates in the VP group were associated with poorer cognition, academic achievement and motor function at 7 years. After controlling for overall brain size, the nucleus accumbens and pallidum were the deep grey matter structures most strongly associated with 7-year neurodevelopmental outcomes. In conclusion, basal ganglia and thalamic growth is delayed during early childhood in VP children, with delayed development contributing to poorer functional outcomes.

KW - Basal ganglia

KW - Neurodevelopment

KW - Thalamus

KW - Very preterm

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U2 - 10.1007/s11682-019-00057-z

DO - 10.1007/s11682-019-00057-z

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