Longitudinal Changes in Self-Efficacy, Mental Health, Abuse, and Stages of Change, for Women Fearful of a Partner: Findings From a Primary Care Trial (WEAVE)

Sonia A. Reisenhofer, Kelsey Hegarty, Jodie Valpied, Lyndsey F. Watson, Mary Ann Davey, Angela Taft

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Women seeking healthcare while experiencing intimate partner violence (IPV) often report a mismatch between healthcare received and desired. An increase in detection of women experiencing IPV through routine screening has not consistently shown a parallel increase in uptake of referrals or decreased abuse. This study investigates relationships between women’s stage of change (SOC), mental health, abuse, social support, and self-efficacy. This study used data from a randomized-controlled trial (RCT) of an intervention to improve outcomes for women afraid of their partners (n = 225; WEAVE). Women’s progress toward change was categorized into pre-contemplation/contemplation (pre-change SOC) or preparation/action/maintenance of change (change-related SOC). Characteristics of women ending the 2-year study in pre-change SOC were compared with those always in change-related and those ending in change-related SOC. Variables were analyzed using multinomial logistic regressions at baseline, 6, 12, and 24 months. Compared with women in pre-change SOC, women always in change-related SOC or ending in change-related SOC are significantly more likely to have higher levels of self-efficacy at 6 (AdjOR = 1.19, confidence interval [CI] = [1.08, 1.30]) and 24 months (AdjOR = 1.21, CI = [1.04, 1.40]). Women always in change-related SOC are always significantly less likely to live with an intimate partner. Women ending in change-related SOC are less likely to live with a partner at 12 (AdjOR = 0.30, CI = [0.12, 0.75]) and 24 (AdjOR = 0.22, CI = [0.06, 0.80]) months. Clinicians should focus on enhancing abused women’s self-efficacy, supporting them to create and maintain positive changes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)337-365
Number of pages29
JournalJournal of Interpersonal Violence
Volume34
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2019
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • depression
  • domestic violence
  • intimate partner violence
  • mental health and Stages of Change
  • self-efficacy

Cite this

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title = "Longitudinal Changes in Self-Efficacy, Mental Health, Abuse, and Stages of Change, for Women Fearful of a Partner: Findings From a Primary Care Trial (WEAVE)",
abstract = "Women seeking healthcare while experiencing intimate partner violence (IPV) often report a mismatch between healthcare received and desired. An increase in detection of women experiencing IPV through routine screening has not consistently shown a parallel increase in uptake of referrals or decreased abuse. This study investigates relationships between women’s stage of change (SOC), mental health, abuse, social support, and self-efficacy. This study used data from a randomized-controlled trial (RCT) of an intervention to improve outcomes for women afraid of their partners (n = 225; WEAVE). Women’s progress toward change was categorized into pre-contemplation/contemplation (pre-change SOC) or preparation/action/maintenance of change (change-related SOC). Characteristics of women ending the 2-year study in pre-change SOC were compared with those always in change-related and those ending in change-related SOC. Variables were analyzed using multinomial logistic regressions at baseline, 6, 12, and 24 months. Compared with women in pre-change SOC, women always in change-related SOC or ending in change-related SOC are significantly more likely to have higher levels of self-efficacy at 6 (AdjOR = 1.19, confidence interval [CI] = [1.08, 1.30]) and 24 months (AdjOR = 1.21, CI = [1.04, 1.40]). Women always in change-related SOC are always significantly less likely to live with an intimate partner. Women ending in change-related SOC are less likely to live with a partner at 12 (AdjOR = 0.30, CI = [0.12, 0.75]) and 24 (AdjOR = 0.22, CI = [0.06, 0.80]) months. Clinicians should focus on enhancing abused women’s self-efficacy, supporting them to create and maintain positive changes.",
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Longitudinal Changes in Self-Efficacy, Mental Health, Abuse, and Stages of Change, for Women Fearful of a Partner : Findings From a Primary Care Trial (WEAVE). / Reisenhofer, Sonia A.; Hegarty, Kelsey; Valpied, Jodie; Watson, Lyndsey F.; Davey, Mary Ann; Taft, Angela.

In: Journal of Interpersonal Violence, Vol. 34, No. 2, 01.01.2019, p. 337-365.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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