Long-term predictors of mortality after percutaneous coronary intervention in the era of drug-eluting stents

William McLeish Wilson, Nick Andrianopoulos, David J Clark, Stephen Duffy, Angela Leone Brennan, Iwan Harries, Gishel New, Martin Sebastian, Philippa Rose Loane, Christopher Michael Reid, Andrew Edward Ajani

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22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The aim was to examine timing, causes, and predictors of death during long-term follow-up after contemporary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) using a large multicenter Australian registry. The cohort consisted of 10,682 consecutive patients from the Melbourne Interventional Group registry undergoing PCI (February 2004 through November 2009). For the first time in Australia, long-term mortality rates of a PCI cohort were defined by linkage to the National Death Index database. The cohort (mean age 64 ? 12 years) comprised 75 men, 24 diabetics, 59 with multivessel disease, 4.4 with renal failure, 25 with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), 2.5 with cardiogenic shock, and 5.1 with heart failure. Drug-eluting stents (DES) were used in 43 of cases. Mean follow-up was 3.2 ? 0.5 years. In-hospital, 30-day, 12-month, and long-term (3.2 ? 0.5 years) mortalities were 1.6 (80 cardiac), 2.1 (79 ), 3.9 (61 ), and 8.2 (50 ), respectively. Independent predictors of long-term mortality included age (hazard ratio 1.05, 95 confidence interval 1.04 to 1.06), cardiogenic shock (4.58, 3.60 to 5.83), renal failure (3.14, 2.58 to 3.82), previous heart failure (1.97, 1.60 to 2.41), STEMI (1.79, 1.47 to 2.18), peripheral vascular disease (1.72, 1.4 to 2.11), non-STEMI (1.58, 1.32 to 1.90), multivessel disease (1.47, 1.24 to 1.74), current smoking (1.39, 1.12 to 1.71), diabetes (1.36, 1.16 to 1.59), and cerebrovascular disease (1.33, 1.06 to 1.60, p
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)936 - 942
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Cardiology
Volume108
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011

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