Long-Term Outcomes in Patients on Life-Long Antibiotics: A Five-Year Cohort Study

Christopher Kiss, Declan Connoley, Kathryn Connelly, Kylie Horne, Tony Korman, Ian Woolley, Jillian S.Y. Lau

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2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Little is known about the impacts at an individual level of long-term antibiotic consumption. We explored health outcomes of long-term antibiotic therapy prescribed to a cohort of patients to suppress infections deemed incurable. Methods: We conducted a 5-year longitudinal study of patients on long-term antibiotics at Monash Health, a metropolitan tertiary-level hospital network in Australia. Adults prescribed antibiotics for >12 months to suppress chronic infection or prevent recurrent infection were included. A retrospective review of medical records and a descriptive analysis was conducted. Results: Twenty-seven patients were followed up during the study period, from 29 patients originally identified in Monash Health in 2014. Seven of the 27 patients (26%) died from causes unrelated to the suppressed infection, six (22%) ceased long-term antibiotic therapy and two (7%) required treatment modification. Fifteen (56%) were colonised with multiresistant microor-ganisms, including vancomycin resistant Enterococci, methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus, and carbapenem resistant Enterobacteriaciae. Conclusions: This work highlights the potential pitfalls of long-term antibiotic therapy, and the frailty of this cohort, who are often ineligible for definitive curative therapy.

Original languageEnglish
Article number62
Number of pages8
JournalAntibiotics
Volume11
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2022

Keywords

  • Antibiotics
  • Antimicrobial resistance
  • Life-long
  • Multi-resistant organisms
  • Suppression

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