Long-term effect of high-dose supplementation with DHA on visual function at school age in children born at < 33 wk gestational age: Results from a follow-up of a randomized controlled trial

Carly S Molloy, Sacha Stokes, Maria Makrides, Carmel T. Collins, Peter J Anderson, Lex W. Doyle

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Background: Children born preterm are at risk of visual-processing impairments. Several lines of evidence have contributed to the rationale that docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) supplementation of preterm infants may improve outcomes in visual processing. Objective: The aim was to determine whether at 7 y of age children who were born very preterm and who received a high-DHA diet have better visual-processing outcomes than do infants fed a standard-DHA diet. Design: This was a follow-up study in a subgroup of children from a randomized controlled trial. Infants were randomly assigned to milk containing a higher concentration of DHA (1% of total fatty acids; high-DHA group) or a standard amount of DHA (0.2-0.3% of total fatty acids as DHA; control group). The randomization schedule was stratified by sex and birth weights of < 1250 or ≥1250 g. A total of 104 (49 in the high-DHA group and 55 in the standard-DHA group) children aged 7 y were assessed on a range of visual-processing measures, including visual acuity, contrast sensitivity, vernier acuity, binocular stereopsis, and visual perception. Results: There was no evidence of differences between the high-DHA and standard-DHA groups in any of the visual-processing measures. In the majority (12 of 13) of variables assessed, the direction of effect favored the control group. The study was large enough to detect a moderate treatment effect, if one truly existed. Conclusion: Supplementing human milk with DHA at a dose of w1% of total fatty acids given in the first months of life to very preterm infants does not appear to confer any long-term benefit for visual processing at school age.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)268-275
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Volume103
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2016
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • DHA
  • Docosahexaenoic acid
  • Preterm infant
  • Very preterm
  • Visual processing

Cite this

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title = "Long-term effect of high-dose supplementation with DHA on visual function at school age in children born at < 33 wk gestational age: Results from a follow-up of a randomized controlled trial",
abstract = "Background: Children born preterm are at risk of visual-processing impairments. Several lines of evidence have contributed to the rationale that docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) supplementation of preterm infants may improve outcomes in visual processing. Objective: The aim was to determine whether at 7 y of age children who were born very preterm and who received a high-DHA diet have better visual-processing outcomes than do infants fed a standard-DHA diet. Design: This was a follow-up study in a subgroup of children from a randomized controlled trial. Infants were randomly assigned to milk containing a higher concentration of DHA (1{\%} of total fatty acids; high-DHA group) or a standard amount of DHA (0.2-0.3{\%} of total fatty acids as DHA; control group). The randomization schedule was stratified by sex and birth weights of < 1250 or ≥1250 g. A total of 104 (49 in the high-DHA group and 55 in the standard-DHA group) children aged 7 y were assessed on a range of visual-processing measures, including visual acuity, contrast sensitivity, vernier acuity, binocular stereopsis, and visual perception. Results: There was no evidence of differences between the high-DHA and standard-DHA groups in any of the visual-processing measures. In the majority (12 of 13) of variables assessed, the direction of effect favored the control group. The study was large enough to detect a moderate treatment effect, if one truly existed. Conclusion: Supplementing human milk with DHA at a dose of w1{\%} of total fatty acids given in the first months of life to very preterm infants does not appear to confer any long-term benefit for visual processing at school age.",
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Long-term effect of high-dose supplementation with DHA on visual function at school age in children born at < 33 wk gestational age : Results from a follow-up of a randomized controlled trial. / Molloy, Carly S; Stokes, Sacha; Makrides, Maria; Collins, Carmel T.; Anderson, Peter J; Doyle, Lex W.

In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Vol. 103, No. 1, 01.2016, p. 268-275.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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T2 - Results from a follow-up of a randomized controlled trial

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AU - Collins, Carmel T.

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AU - Doyle, Lex W.

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