Lipidomic profiling in inflammatory bowel disease

Comparison between ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease

Fenling Fan, Piyushkumar A Mundra, Lu Fang, Abby Galvin, Xiao Lei Moore, Jacquelyn M Weir, Gerard Wong, David A. White, Jaye Chin-Dusting, Miles P. Sparrow, Peter J. Meikle, Anthony M. Dart

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), which encompasses ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD), is believed to be caused by abnormal host immune responses to the intestinal microbiome. However, the precise etiology of IBD remains unknown. Lipid metabolism and signaling are suggested to play important roles in inflammation with significant implications for IBD. In this study, we aimed to characterize lipidomic profiles in IBD with comparison between healthy controls, UC, and CD. Methods: Patients with IBD (n 40, UC: 16 and CD: 24) and age- and gender-matched healthy volunteers (n 84) were recruited. Plasma lipid profiles containing 333 lipid species were measured using electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry. Results: A total of 86 individual lipid species were significantly changed in CD compared with controls (78 decreased while 8 increased), with the majority belonging to the ether lipids including the alkylphospholipids (alkylphosphatidylcholine and alkylphosphatidylethanolamine) and plasmalogens (alkenylphosphatidylcholine and alkenylphosphatidylethanolamine). Of these 86 lipid species, 33 remained significantly and negatively associated with CD after adjusting for age, sex, waist circumference, current smoking, and diastolic blood pressure in logistic regression. In contrast, only 5 lipid species significantly differed between UC and controls. Conclusions: We demonstrate that a number of ether lipids (alkylphospholipid and plasmalogens) are significantly and negatively associated with CD. These alterations of lipid profiles particularly plasmalogens may contribute to the pathogenesis of IBD.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1511-1518
Number of pages8
JournalInflammatory Bowel Diseases
Volume21
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2015
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Crohn's disease
  • inflammatory bowel disease
  • lipid profiles
  • plasmalogens
  • ulcerative colitis

Cite this

Fan, Fenling ; Mundra, Piyushkumar A ; Fang, Lu ; Galvin, Abby ; Moore, Xiao Lei ; Weir, Jacquelyn M ; Wong, Gerard ; White, David A. ; Chin-Dusting, Jaye ; Sparrow, Miles P. ; Meikle, Peter J. ; Dart, Anthony M. / Lipidomic profiling in inflammatory bowel disease : Comparison between ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease. In: Inflammatory Bowel Diseases. 2015 ; Vol. 21, No. 7. pp. 1511-1518.
@article{050ce0fb6e4f427e9cef5306b627b267,
title = "Lipidomic profiling in inflammatory bowel disease: Comparison between ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease",
abstract = "Background: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), which encompasses ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD), is believed to be caused by abnormal host immune responses to the intestinal microbiome. However, the precise etiology of IBD remains unknown. Lipid metabolism and signaling are suggested to play important roles in inflammation with significant implications for IBD. In this study, we aimed to characterize lipidomic profiles in IBD with comparison between healthy controls, UC, and CD. Methods: Patients with IBD (n 40, UC: 16 and CD: 24) and age- and gender-matched healthy volunteers (n 84) were recruited. Plasma lipid profiles containing 333 lipid species were measured using electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry. Results: A total of 86 individual lipid species were significantly changed in CD compared with controls (78 decreased while 8 increased), with the majority belonging to the ether lipids including the alkylphospholipids (alkylphosphatidylcholine and alkylphosphatidylethanolamine) and plasmalogens (alkenylphosphatidylcholine and alkenylphosphatidylethanolamine). Of these 86 lipid species, 33 remained significantly and negatively associated with CD after adjusting for age, sex, waist circumference, current smoking, and diastolic blood pressure in logistic regression. In contrast, only 5 lipid species significantly differed between UC and controls. Conclusions: We demonstrate that a number of ether lipids (alkylphospholipid and plasmalogens) are significantly and negatively associated with CD. These alterations of lipid profiles particularly plasmalogens may contribute to the pathogenesis of IBD.",
keywords = "Crohn's disease, inflammatory bowel disease, lipid profiles, plasmalogens, ulcerative colitis",
author = "Fenling Fan and Mundra, {Piyushkumar A} and Lu Fang and Abby Galvin and Moore, {Xiao Lei} and Weir, {Jacquelyn M} and Gerard Wong and White, {David A.} and Jaye Chin-Dusting and Sparrow, {Miles P.} and Meikle, {Peter J.} and Dart, {Anthony M.}",
year = "2015",
month = "7",
doi = "10.1097/MIB.0000000000000394",
language = "English",
volume = "21",
pages = "1511--1518",
journal = "Inflammatory Bowel Diseases",
issn = "1078-0998",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams & Wilkins",
number = "7",

}

Lipidomic profiling in inflammatory bowel disease : Comparison between ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease. / Fan, Fenling; Mundra, Piyushkumar A; Fang, Lu; Galvin, Abby; Moore, Xiao Lei; Weir, Jacquelyn M; Wong, Gerard; White, David A.; Chin-Dusting, Jaye; Sparrow, Miles P.; Meikle, Peter J.; Dart, Anthony M.

In: Inflammatory Bowel Diseases, Vol. 21, No. 7, 07.2015, p. 1511-1518.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Lipidomic profiling in inflammatory bowel disease

T2 - Comparison between ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease

AU - Fan, Fenling

AU - Mundra, Piyushkumar A

AU - Fang, Lu

AU - Galvin, Abby

AU - Moore, Xiao Lei

AU - Weir, Jacquelyn M

AU - Wong, Gerard

AU - White, David A.

AU - Chin-Dusting, Jaye

AU - Sparrow, Miles P.

AU - Meikle, Peter J.

AU - Dart, Anthony M.

PY - 2015/7

Y1 - 2015/7

N2 - Background: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), which encompasses ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD), is believed to be caused by abnormal host immune responses to the intestinal microbiome. However, the precise etiology of IBD remains unknown. Lipid metabolism and signaling are suggested to play important roles in inflammation with significant implications for IBD. In this study, we aimed to characterize lipidomic profiles in IBD with comparison between healthy controls, UC, and CD. Methods: Patients with IBD (n 40, UC: 16 and CD: 24) and age- and gender-matched healthy volunteers (n 84) were recruited. Plasma lipid profiles containing 333 lipid species were measured using electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry. Results: A total of 86 individual lipid species were significantly changed in CD compared with controls (78 decreased while 8 increased), with the majority belonging to the ether lipids including the alkylphospholipids (alkylphosphatidylcholine and alkylphosphatidylethanolamine) and plasmalogens (alkenylphosphatidylcholine and alkenylphosphatidylethanolamine). Of these 86 lipid species, 33 remained significantly and negatively associated with CD after adjusting for age, sex, waist circumference, current smoking, and diastolic blood pressure in logistic regression. In contrast, only 5 lipid species significantly differed between UC and controls. Conclusions: We demonstrate that a number of ether lipids (alkylphospholipid and plasmalogens) are significantly and negatively associated with CD. These alterations of lipid profiles particularly plasmalogens may contribute to the pathogenesis of IBD.

AB - Background: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), which encompasses ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD), is believed to be caused by abnormal host immune responses to the intestinal microbiome. However, the precise etiology of IBD remains unknown. Lipid metabolism and signaling are suggested to play important roles in inflammation with significant implications for IBD. In this study, we aimed to characterize lipidomic profiles in IBD with comparison between healthy controls, UC, and CD. Methods: Patients with IBD (n 40, UC: 16 and CD: 24) and age- and gender-matched healthy volunteers (n 84) were recruited. Plasma lipid profiles containing 333 lipid species were measured using electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry. Results: A total of 86 individual lipid species were significantly changed in CD compared with controls (78 decreased while 8 increased), with the majority belonging to the ether lipids including the alkylphospholipids (alkylphosphatidylcholine and alkylphosphatidylethanolamine) and plasmalogens (alkenylphosphatidylcholine and alkenylphosphatidylethanolamine). Of these 86 lipid species, 33 remained significantly and negatively associated with CD after adjusting for age, sex, waist circumference, current smoking, and diastolic blood pressure in logistic regression. In contrast, only 5 lipid species significantly differed between UC and controls. Conclusions: We demonstrate that a number of ether lipids (alkylphospholipid and plasmalogens) are significantly and negatively associated with CD. These alterations of lipid profiles particularly plasmalogens may contribute to the pathogenesis of IBD.

KW - Crohn's disease

KW - inflammatory bowel disease

KW - lipid profiles

KW - plasmalogens

KW - ulcerative colitis

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84932173022&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1097/MIB.0000000000000394

DO - 10.1097/MIB.0000000000000394

M3 - Article

VL - 21

SP - 1511

EP - 1518

JO - Inflammatory Bowel Diseases

JF - Inflammatory Bowel Diseases

SN - 1078-0998

IS - 7

ER -