Linking life-history theory and metabolic theory explains the offspring size-temperature relationship

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Temperature often affects maternal investment in offspring. Across and within species, mothers in colder environments generally produce larger offspring than mothers in warmer environments, but the underlying drivers of this relationship remain unresolved. We formally evaluated the ubiquity of the temperature–offspring size relationship and found strong support for a negative relationship across a wide variety of ectotherms. We then tested an explanation for this relationship that formally links life-history and metabolic theories. We estimated the costs of development across temperatures using a series of laboratory experiments on model organisms, and a meta-analysis across 72 species of ectotherms spanning five phyla. We found that both metabolic and developmental rates increase with temperature, but developmental rate is more temperature sensitive than metabolic rate, such that the overall costs of development decrease with temperature. Hence, within a species’ natural temperature range, development at relatively cooler temperatures requires mothers to produce larger, better provisioned offspring.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)518-526
Number of pages9
JournalEcology Letters
Volume22
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 7 Jan 2019

Keywords

  • Development
  • egg size
  • embryo size
  • incubation
  • larval size
  • maternal investment
  • metabolism

Cite this

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title = "Linking life-history theory and metabolic theory explains the offspring size-temperature relationship",
abstract = "Temperature often affects maternal investment in offspring. Across and within species, mothers in colder environments generally produce larger offspring than mothers in warmer environments, but the underlying drivers of this relationship remain unresolved. We formally evaluated the ubiquity of the temperature–offspring size relationship and found strong support for a negative relationship across a wide variety of ectotherms. We then tested an explanation for this relationship that formally links life-history and metabolic theories. We estimated the costs of development across temperatures using a series of laboratory experiments on model organisms, and a meta-analysis across 72 species of ectotherms spanning five phyla. We found that both metabolic and developmental rates increase with temperature, but developmental rate is more temperature sensitive than metabolic rate, such that the overall costs of development decrease with temperature. Hence, within a species’ natural temperature range, development at relatively cooler temperatures requires mothers to produce larger, better provisioned offspring.",
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Linking life-history theory and metabolic theory explains the offspring size-temperature relationship. / Pettersen, Amanda Kate; White, Craig Robert; Bryson-Richardson, Robert J.; Marshall, Dustin.

In: Ecology Letters, Vol. 22, No. 3, 07.01.2019, p. 518-526.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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AU - Pettersen, Amanda Kate

AU - White, Craig Robert

AU - Bryson-Richardson, Robert J.

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