Linking cerebral palsy upper limb measures to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health

Brian Hoare, Christine Imms, Melinda Randall, Leeanne Carey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Intervention studies describe outcomes as measuring specific domains of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF). However, the same measure may be described by different authors as assessing different domains, resulting in considerable confusion and inconsistent reporting of outcomes. Objective: To systematically link the scored items from the Melbourne Assessment of Unilateral Upper Limb Function, Quality of Upper Extremity Skills Test and Assisting Hand Assessment to domain(s) of the ICF. Methods: The meaningful concept for each scored item was defined. Using ICF linking rules, the concepts were assigned ICF codes to determine the outcome's overall domain of measurement. Results: The Melbourne Assessment predominantly evaluates concepts in the body function domain. Coding of the Quality of Upper Extremity Skills Test indicated that dissociated movement, weight-bearing and protective extension predominantly measure concepts in the body function domain. Grasp was the only domain where concepts were coded in both the body function and activity domains. The Assisting Hand Assessment was the only measure where the majority of items assessed concepts in the activity domain. Conclusion: Measures of upper limb function can be categorized according to ICF domains. These findings should resolve confusion surrounding the classification of these measures and provide a reference for reporting the impact of intervention.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)987-996
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Rehabilitation Medicine
Volume43
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2011
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Assessment
  • Cerebral palsy
  • Upper extremity

Cite this